WOMEN IN STEM: HOW INDIA IS LEADING THE WAY - The Daily Guardian
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WOMEN IN STEM: HOW INDIA IS LEADING THE WAY

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According to The Equality Equation: Advancing the Participation of Women and Girls in STEM—a World Bank report which provides a rich overview of global patterns of gender gaps in STEM education—merely 18% of girls enrolled at the tertiary level are pursuing studies in the field of STEM as compared to 35% of boys.

Women, in fact, account for only 33% of researchers, 22% of professionals working in artificial intelligence, and 28% of engineering students across the world. This is the case despite the repeated global calls for increasing women’s representation in the STEM workforce. The scenario, however, is much better in India with nearly 43% of STEM graduates being women, as opposed to other developed nations like the United States, Canada, and the UK, where there are fewer women—34%, 31%, and 38% respectively—studying STEM at the tertiary level. As per the annual All India Survey on Higher Education (AISHE) report, which indicates enrolment in undergraduate, Masters, and PhD-level programs, the number of women in India who have opted for STEM courses has increased from 10,02,707 in 2017-18 to 10,56,095 in 2019-2020.

And while the number of women in STEM has experienced a rise of almost 53,338 in the last three years, a similar trend has not been visible in terms of men’s participation in STEM education, with the number of men who enrolled for STEM studies, in fact, declining from 12,48,062 in 2018–2018 to 11,88,900 in 2019–2020. Besides enrolments, it has further been observed that women in the STEM field across the globe publish fewer research papers. But here too, India is an exception, with one in three research papers being written by a female author in over 186 fields as per the Scopus database. In fact, women are almost at par with their male counterparts in subjects such as dentistry, psychology, and the humanities, where for every two male authors, there is at least one female author. These advancements could, nonetheless, not have been possible without the initiatives undertak en by the Government of India (GoI), which today have made women’s participation in STEM an impressive possibility for the country.

For instance, at the school level, the Department of Science and Technology (DST) launched the Vigyan Jyoti scheme in 2020, according to which schools were directed to conduct regular special lectures, classes, and science camps as a way of encouraging female students—especially those belonging to classes 9 to 12—to pursue higher education in STEM. In another move, the GoI announced scholarships like Pragati through the All-India Council for Technical Education, making it easier for girls to access technical education at the undergraduate and diploma levels.

To support the development of a gender-equitable ecosystem within higher education and research institutions, the DST launched a pilot project—Gender Advancement for Transforming Institutions (GATI). By becoming signatories to the GATI charter, institutions will commit to adopting gender-sensitive policies and practises for women in STEM courses. Additionally, the DST also launched the Consolidation of University Research for Innovation and Excellence (CURIE) initiative, which provides support to women’s universities in improving their research and development (R&D) facilities. So far, eight women’s universities have successfully received support under CURIE, with artificial intelligence labs established in six of them.

For female researchers interested in undertaking R&D activities, the Science and Engineering Research Board (SERB) formulated SERB-POWER (Promoting Opportunities for Women in Exploratory Research) as a funding framework that is aimed at providing financial assistance through grants and fellowships, enabling women to pursue their STEM research projects. A similar initiative, Biotechnology Career Advancement and Re-orientation Programme (BioCARe), was also undertaken by the Department of Biotechnology (DBT) as a step forward to encourage women scientists to take up biotechnology research. Besides national initiatives, much is also being done at the international level that has boosted women’s participation in scientific research.

A good example of such an initiative is the DST’s “Indo-U.S. Fellowship for Women in STEM”, launched in collaboration with the Indo-U.S. Science and Technology Forum (IUSSTF) in the United States (US). The fellowship provides opportunities for women scientists, engineers, and technologists to undertake research in premier institutions in the US in order to enhance their research capacities and capabilities. To recognise the achievements of women in STEM, the GoI every year commemorates the SERB Women Excellence Award, recognising young female fellows and achievers of the National Science Academies. Similarly, the National Women Bioscientists Award acknowledges the contributions of senior and young women scientists in biology and biotechnology. In 2020, Smt. Smriti Zubin Irani, the Minister for Women and Child Development, announced the establishment of 11 chairs in the names of Indian women scientists at institutes across the country to honour their achievements and inspire young girls and women. Yet, the turnaround for women’s participation in STEM-related jobs in the country currently hovers at around 14%.

The reasons for this unfortunate state of affairs include but are not limited to the persistent institutional gender biases, strictly defined gender norms, patriarchal culture, etc. However, the important thing that needs to be understood here is that a lot has already been and is continuing to be done to accelerate women’s inclusion in STEM. This leaves us with little doubt that in times to come, the number of women in STEM in India will rise not only in academia but also in workspaces. Akanksha Khullar is an Assistant Manager, Strategic Investment Research Unit at Invest India. Her work predominantly focuses on gender issues, particularly on understanding the Women, Peace and Security agenda and identifying how national, regional, and international organisations contribute to shaping the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325. Akanksha has authored several pieces for The Diplomat, The Quint, Deccan Herald, Asia Times, Modern Diplomacy, South China Morning Post, South Asian Voices, etc. She holds a Masters of International Relations (Advanced) degree from the Australian National University and a Bachelor of Arts (Honors) degree in Political Science from Jesus and Mary College, University of Delhi. She tweets at @akankshakhullar. Nalini Bhandari is a Manager, Strategic Investment Research Unit at Invest India. She holds a master’s in social entrepreneurship from the Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai. Nalini has worked extensively with rural women entrepreneurs on programmes focusing on imparting digital literacy, entrepreneurship skills, and enhancing their psychosocial development.

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The unbreakable bond between siblings; find out some sibling duos

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Brother sister bond

Rakshabandhan is considered a symbol of love and affection between brother and sister. If you have grown up with a sibling you must have experienced fights over silly things which build an inseparable bond. On the occasion of Raksha Bandhan, here is a list of the five brother-sister bonds.

Let’s learn about some of the sibling duos:

Priyanka Gandhi and Rahul Gandhi

Rahul Gandhi and Priyanka Gandhi

Congress leader Rahul Gandhi and Priyanka Gandhi are children of former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi and Sonia Gandia. The brother-sister duo shares a very special bond and has always been publically expressive of the love and the bond they share. Priyanka is two years elder than Rahul. The two are each other’s friends and protectors. Talking about her sister, Rahul said, “There is a special place in my life for my sister. We are not only friends but also protectors of each other.” The brother-sister duo had been each other’s pillars for all these years. However, Priyanka is married to Robert Vadra and they both have two children. They both are from the most influential political family in India.

Salman Khan and Arpita Khan Sharma

Salman Khan and Arpita Khan Sharma

Bollywood superstar Salman Khan shares a close bond with her sister Arpita Khan Sharma. Arpita Khan is a much beloved younger sister of Salman, Arbaaz, Sohail, and Alvira. Salman adores Arpita and considers her to be his lucky charm. Every single member of the Khan family adored Arpita. However, Arpita is married to Ayush Sharma and the couple is parents to son Ahil Sharma and daughter Ayat Sharma. Even though they are not biological siblings, Salman loves and adores Arpita more than his biological sister Alvira.

Isha Ambani and Akash Ambani

Akash Ambani and Isha Ambani

Akash Ambani and Isha Ambani are the twin heirs of one of the richest men in the world Mukesh Ambani and Nita Ambani. Isha once told Vogue India about her childhood and brother Akash. She said, “she was “naughty” and had to “fight for survival” many times.” The twins share a very precious bond as Akash changed his wedding date for her sister Isha. Both Isha and Akash are involved in the family business for years now. Moreover, Akash is married to Shloka Mehta and Isha is married to Anand Piramal.

Hardik Pandya and Krunal Pandya (Pandya Brothers)

Hardik Pandya and Krunal Pandya

Pandya Brothers are probably the most famous pair of siblings in Indian sports currently. They are Indian International cricketers. Hardik Pandya and Krunal Pandya hail the city of Vadodara in Gujarat. “It’s difficult to explain my equation with him in words. Hardik and I literally think the same things all the time,” Krunal said. Talking about Krunal, Hardik said, “We have this incredible bond and cricket has been our life. He is someone I have spent most of my life with, more than friends and either of our parents.” Pandya’s brother’s story is nothing short of a fairy tale.

Geeta Phogat and Babita Phogat (Phogat Sisters)

Babita Phogat and Geeta Phogat

The journey of the Phogat sisters is incredible they need no introduction. They are born to a wrestling-crazy father Mahavir Phogat. Breaking the stereotypes of dominating male wrestling Geeta and Babita Phogat have won everybody’s hearts with their wrestling skills. Geeta is India’s first-ever wrestling gold medal at the Commonwealth Games in 2010. Meanwhile, Babita won bronze at World Championship.

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IS WEB 3.0 CHANGING THE INTERNET?

Web 3.0 is proposed to take the power back from tech giants and give every individual their own web presence on the internet.

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Do you realise how different the internet we use today is from what it was just 10 years back? The internet itself has undergone several shifts to become what we see today. But this is not the end.

Some experts say that today’s internet is what the automobile industry looked like in the 1920s. This means, even after being around for almost 20 years, it still is in its growing stage. Changing and improving every other day. 

With this ever-advancing technology, yet comes another buzzword-Web3. It has become the core focus of discussions among tech enthusiasts and crypto-geeks, an idea that focuses on eliminating all the intermediaries. 

The World Wide Web was created so that every individual could do anything they wanted to. But, instead, the tech giants and the algorithms instead started dominating. Web 3.0 is proposed to take back the power from these dominators and give every individual their own web presence on the internet. 

But where did it all start? Let’s dive into its origin!

WEB 1.0 AND WEB 2.0

The initial days of the web only allowed limited features. In the 1990s, with Web 1.0, people could only read information on the internet. There were no ways to interact with the information provider. Connected merely by hyperlinks, the syntactic web provided no option for the end-users to do anything else but just read what’s provided.

The era of static web pages ended with the emergence of Web 2.0 in the 2000s. It signifies today’s internet. Social media platforms and search engines like Facebook, Google, and Twitter have started giving people the freedom to interact, connect, and transact online. Web 2.0 encouraged end-users to transition from passive to active content providers. Today, almost everyone, from every corner of the world, can access the internet. 

Although developed for every individual, critics say that big corporations have dominated the internet and exercised too much power.

Web 3.0 is intended to take back the power and give it to every user equally. 

EVOLUTION TO 3.0

The platforms we use today are owned by a group of companies. Web3 aims at changing this aspect by coming up with new social media platforms and search engines that will have no controller—decentralised. 

Experts say that the next version of the internet, the semantic web or Web 3.0, will be more intelligent than the one at present. In simple words, the idea behind this is to merge today’s worldwide web with Blockchain technology—the famous technology behind cryptocurrencies. 

In Web 3.0, developers build programs on the blockchain, decentralised peer-to-peer servers, or a hybrid of the two called Apps.

WILL WEB 3.0 BE THE NEW NORM?

Web 3.0 has huge potential, and apparently, it’s already here. But some experts say that Web 3 won’t totally replace Web 2 anytime soon and will work simultaneously.

This means blockchain-based social media platforms may grow and provide more efficiency than what we are experiencing now. But, it won’t wipe off the already dominating tech giants in the near future. There is also a huge chance that the Web2 companies will merge into the Web3 technologies to stay relevant in the ever-advancing world. 

A good example would be how Facebook, a Web2 world company, tapped into the metaverse space. 

WHY IS WEB 3.0 HYPED UP?

There are a lot of reasons why everyone is looking out for the next generation of the internet. 

Web 3.0 is aimed at providing:

1. Complete ownership of data to the end-users.

2. Elimination of intermediaries or central authority.

3. Privacy and tracking of information.

4. Incentivise creators andeveryone maintaining the network. 

Without a doubt, having so much of society’s social fabric and economic systems dependent on infrastructure controlled by a few private businesses is detrimental.

WHAT ABOUT ITS DOWNSIDES?

With every good thing, come its drawbacks. Even with the highly intelligent paradigm shift of the internet from 2.0 to 3.0, there are certain challenges to face.

Devices that are less advanced won’t be able to tap into the new stage.

Too complicated for newcomers.

Web 1.0 will appear even more outdated. 

Sceptics say “Web 3.0 is vapourware”, i.e., something that’s being promised but can never be delivered. Others say that people have too much money to invest and to do that they just need a reason. 

Nonetheless, even though Web 3.0 is mostly theoretical as of now, if the above problems can be fixed, we will be able to experience a massive shift in the internet space for the good. 

THE BOTTOMLINE

It is not about taking down Facebook or Google, but more about less control and transparency.

We deserve much better than to be controlled by powerful monopolies. Any platform that paves the pathway for transparency and freedom is sure to take over the digital space in the future. 

Web 3.0 has huge potential, and apparently, it’s already here. But some experts say that Web 3 .0 won’t totally replace Web 2.0 anytime soon and will work simultaneously.

The next internet stage will change the way we interact. More precisely, Web 3.0 will be:TRANSPARENT

Transparent in the sense that applications and programs will be built using open-source software by an open community of developers. The development and deployment of these applications will be transparent, and anyone can benefit from the available virtual resources. TRUSTLESS

This means the total elimination of intermediaries. People can transact and interact without the involvement of any “trusted” third parties. PERMISSIONLESS

In today’s internet stage, the few big companies that own the social media platforms that we use hold all our information. Yes, every bit of data we put out there. We won’t know exactly how this information is being used, as scary as it may sound.

Decentralisation targets this side of the web. Web 3.0 will ensure everyone can stay autonomous. There would be no need to share sensitive personal data. Plus, since there will be no governing body, which means, anyone can use the internet to their benefit without anyone’s approval.

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Indian Freedom fighters: The ladies beyond their time

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Indian flag

The freedom we have been bestowed is a corollary of the blood and sweat of the brave hearts who had the spark to outshine the mastery of British ascendency.

Let’s learn the untold story of some gallant fighters who gave us Free India and uprooted the enslavement.

Durgavati Devi

In an era where women were believed to be delicate dolls adorned with jewels, Durgawati Devi, also known as Durga Bhabhi, crafted history with her contributions to the National Freedom Struggle against the British East India Company. ‘The Agni of India’ married at the age of 11, became a member of Naujawan Bharat Sabha, and played an important role in the escape of Bhagat Singh after Saunders’ killing in 1928. She attempted to slay Lord Hailey (an atrocious Britisher) as a revenge for Bhagat Singh’s hanging but failed, consequently landing in prison. The brave lady was much beyond her time, bearing the flag of women’s empowerment.

Matingini Hazra

At the age of 62, the dauntless lady Matingini Hazra set an example of a zealous nationalist. In 1932, when the Civil disobedience movement  was relaumched, Poor pesant Matingini became instrumental in the freedom struggle and started actively  participating in  movements aiming to dethrown the Britishers. In 1942, when the Congress workers decided to besiege the police stations and government offices, Hazra took the initiative to lead the movement. The 73-year-old lady paved the way along with six thousand supporters to capture Tamluk Police Station. The Crown police ordered the march to dissolve when it got close to the town, invoking Section 144 of the Indian Penal Code. A bullet struck Courageous Matangini as she moved forward and begged the cops not to shoot at the gathering. Despite being shot, she moved forward, changing Vande Matram. Drenched in blood, taking her last breath, the warrior held the tricolour high.

Bhikaji Rustom Cama

It was August 21, 1907. Thousands of people were gathered to attend the International Socialist Conference in Stuttgart, Germany. The fearless Bhikaji Rustom Cama took to the attention of those thousand representatives and unfurled the Indian Tricolour on the foreign ground, leaving the crowd awestruck.

She said…

“Behold, the flag of independent India is born! It has been made sacred by the blood of young Indians who sacrificed their lives in its honour. In the name of this flag, I appeal to lovers of freedom all over the world to support this struggle. “

The entire crowd was amazed by the unforeseen incident, and stood to salute the Indian flag.

Despite being aware of the repercussions of defying the British, the intrepid heroes, or shall I say heroines, exhibited an imbued patriotism.

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Craftomaniacs and Handloom Hysteria

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This year is the commemoration of the 8th Indian handloom celebrations. The theme this time is towards increasing the income of weavers, with the focus on augmenting the sales count of handloom items on e-commerce websites. 

The latest disorder seen among people is craftomania. It is the latest rage and the most revolting pseudo idea shared online. Also, it is gross when every nook and corner boutique owner puts out a photograph of their tailors with a placard that says, “I made it.”

A handloom worker weaves a unique and beautiful design.A handloom worker weaves at Sintha Handloom and Handicrafts Complex CFC, in Imphal.

If you look closer, there is a larger canvas of inequality. There are block printmakers, tie and dye workers, some who stitch the button holes in an exorbitant garment, and also the embroiderers who thread the needle with sometimes very poor visibility, yet they stoically continue the craft. Do they equally benefit financially from this craftomania disease? One thing is for sure, it makes the ones sporting this mania the “intelligent, aware folks,” but the truth is far from the picture that’s painted. 

Many craftomaniacs do not hesitate to haggle on the price of a handloom sari or a few metres of fabric with the non-English-speaking weaver but are part of the handloom hysteria for exactly one day.

This year is the commemoration of the 8th Indian handloom celebrations. The theme this time is towards increasing the income of weavers, with the focus on augmenting the sales count of handloom items on e-commerce websites. 

But we are far away from the 26,73,891 handloom weavers, spread across India, many of whom remain officially unaccounted for.

According to Prasad Bidapa, the iconic fashion Guru of India, who has been representing Indian handlooms across the world, said, “Handloom is the handwriting of our heritage, a continuous process since ancient times of weaving exquisite fabrics. India is unique, with a variety of hand-woven treasures that define our culture and make us the proud torchbearers of tradition and beauty. Wear handloom often!”

There is no definite historical evidence as to when the Indian weaving industry started. Though, according to popular belief and circumstances, it might have started in the 8th century, which dates back to the Chalukya dynasty, when weaving was in full swing.

In the 21st century, the handloom sector is the second largest economic activity after agriculture. We have around 6 million farmers in India who have their livelihoods dependent on cotton production.

The handloom industry dates back to the pre-independence period, and the new economic policy in India was implemented to thrust this industry towards growth. But, we are yet to see these policies fully implemented and also the lost craft reinvented, keeping it in sync with modernity. 

As the handloom industry is mostly concentrated in rural India, it remains the most unorganised sector in the country. But there are many organisations like Hundred Hands, Dastkar, and FICCI FLO, which have introduced initiatives where the weavers and artisans can directly sell to the buyers. According to Jayshree Menon, Chairperson of FICCI FLO Bengaluru Chapter, “By taking handlooms forward, we are going to be promoting the richness of our culture and history. There is so much potential that it offers, all we need to do is to bring it into the mainstream.

The aftermath of Covid-19 left a very large number of weavers who suffered losses in business. Many of them have changed jobs, and some have abandoned spinning yarns in favour of power looms in order to save manpower, money, and time. In the process, they also often lose the art that they are bestowed with.

The National Handloom Development Programme (NHDP) is an attempt to facilitate the sustainable development of handloom weavers located in and outside identified handloom clusters into cohesive, self-sustaining work. But there is still a long way ahead, though a few brands are incorporating Indian handlooms into their style.

Aratrik Dev Burman, Founder of Tilla, opines, “Indian handlooms form the core of Tilla. Besides being unique and beautiful, they employ a very large number of artisans all over the country, keeping traditional knowledge systems and identities alive. Our textiles are among India’s finest gifts to the world!”

India needs to create a wholesome organised sector for the handloom industry, where lost and dying arts can once again be reinvented. 

One does get turned off as a buyer with the selection of colours on motifs that can sometimes be garishly kitschy with the sensibilities of a rural product. As much as the world market appreciates the idea of handmade items, we have to also understand that to become a big player in the international market, the weavers need to be trained and educated on softer colours and quality that is on par with the world. This can fetch a good price, thereby making their lives better and keeping the art alive.

Many genuine craft lovers have complained, saying that there is a delay in receiving products from weavers. They are still not trained in understanding the on-time delivery commitments. Therefore, many genuine people give up this cause to avoid the embarrassment of not being able to ensure timely delivery of goods.

One must admit, craftomania is a very good movement, but it can’t survive if it remains only at a superficial level. This is way deeper and more challenging than just groups getting together to sell the idea of “handmade in India” to many Indians who don’t care.

Like Independence Day is celebrated across India, we need to also introduce Handloom Day as a national day of heritage among school kids who are generally busy thinking of the next iPhone model to buy or the latest fast fashion to don. They need to be educated on how fatal it is to the environment and to an economy that has many weavers languishing in poverty.

According to Pratima Pandey, Founder and Director of Pramaa, “Handloom needs to be respected as a language by the younger generation.”

Mohua Chinappa is an author and a podcaster of a show called The Mohua Show. 

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WHEN JASON MOMOA TURNED FLIGHT ATTENDANT, INTERNET GOES CRAZY

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Jason Momoa surprised the passengers aboard a flight to Hawaii on Tuesday as he pushed the snacks cart, handing out water bottles. The video has now gone viral on social media and people are appreciating the actor for being so humble.

According to a report by the New York Post, Jason served water bottles of his own ‘Manalunu’ brand that promises to be a sustainable company. As per the report, Jason even gifted every passenger 10,000 Hawaiian Airlines miles.

On the work front, Jason will next be seen sharing screen space with Amber Heard in ‘Aquaman 2’. The sequel will also star original cast members – Nicole Kidman, Temuera Morrison, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Patrick Wilson, and Dolph Lundgren. New stars to join the cast of the forthcoming action flick include Indya Moore and Jani Zhao. The film is slated for release in March next year.

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LOVE MAKES THE WORLD GO AROUND

Dr Chavi Bhargava Sharma

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Love is a spectrum, and the two ends are destruction and construction. We have destroyed lives in the name of love and built mausoleums in the name of love.

Carbon dating love is easy. It began with the love story of Shiva and Sati (Parvati), to Krishna and Radha, Savitri and Satyavan, Nal and Damayanti, Romeo and Juliet, Heer and Ranjha, Mirabai, Helen and Paris, Cleopatra and Mark Anthony, and the list is never ending. Every day, there are people falling in love, dying for love, killing for love, heartbroken because of love and living because of love. But thousands of years later, love still stays as allusive and alluring as ever. There are more than 100 million love songs and countless stories, ballads, poems, movies on love and yet it seems like it is never enough.

The word love means many things-affection, bonding, broken heart, compassionate love, conjugal love, courtly love, falling in love, free love, friendship love, interpersonal relationship, intimacy, love addiction, love at first sight, triangle love, loving-kindness, lovesickness, love-struck, obsession love, passion, puppy love, relationship love, self-love, unconditional love, unrequited love, sexual passion, deep friendship, love for anyone, love for family, longstanding love and love for self. And most of us have experienced all of these.

Psychologists say that love can be understood in terms of three components. These three are intimacy, passion, and decision/commitment. Each component manifests a different aspect of love. 

Intimacy: Intimacy refers to feelings of closeness, connectedness, and bondedness in loving relationships. It thus includes within its purview those feelings that give rise, essentially, to the experience of warmth in a loving relationship. 

Passion: Passion refers to the drives that lead to romance, physical attraction, sexual consummation, and related phenomena in loving relationships.  The passion component includes within its purview those sources of motivational and other forms of arousal that lead to the experience of passion in a loving relationship. 

Decision/commitment: Decision/commitment refers, in the short-term, to the decision that one loves a certain other person, and in the long-term, to one’s commitment to maintain that love. 

The three components of love interact with each other, and we form certain stories of and about love in our heads. Almost all of us are exposed to large numbers of diverse stories that convey different conceptions of how love can be understood.  Some of these stories may be explicitly intended as love stories; others may have love stories embedded in the context of larger stories. They could be Eros (sexual passion), Philia (deep friendship), Ludus (playful love), Agape (love for everyone), Pragma (longstanding love), Philautic (love of the self), Storge (family love), Mania (obsessive love).

Various potential partners fit our stories to greater or lesser degrees, and we are more likely to succeed in close relationships with people whose stories more rather than less closely match our own. Although, the stories we create are our own, they draw on our experience of living in the world–on fairy tales we may have heard when we were young, from the models of love relationships we observe around us in parents and relatives, from television and movies, from conversations with other people about their relationships, and so forth. 

Although the number of possible stories like genders is probably infinite, certain genres of stories seem to keep emerging again and again.

The problem with love is that we project our fantasies onto people and expect them to play the part, but people aren’t empty vessels for us to fill up with our daydreams and stories. When the daydreams, stories of two people complement, supplement, overlap, and are in sync, then we get a workable, sustainable, happy love story, but often it does not happen.

While there is no magic potion to ensure a never-ending love story, knowing the stories that are running in our head and in our partner’s helps towards understanding ourselves and our partner and making love last.

So, what’s your kind of love story?

DECODING LOVE

• Love is an Addiction: Strong anxious attachment; clinging behaviour; anxiety at thought of losing partner. 

• Love is a Business: Relationships and love is a business proposition; money is power; partners in close relationships as business partners. 

• Love is a Collection: Partner viewed as “fitting in” to some overall scheme; partner viewed in a detached way as one collects artefacts.

• Love is a Cookbook: Doing things a certain way (recipe) results in relationship being more likely to work out; departure from recipe for success leads to increased likelihood of failure.

• Love is a Fantasy: Often expects to be saved by a knight in shining armour or to marry a princess and live happily ever after.

• Love is a Game: Love as a game or sport with the chase and the kill.

• Love is like Gardening: Relationships need to be continually nurtured and tended to like a garden.

• Love is like a Government: (a) Autocratic – One partner dominates or even controls other. (b) Democratic: Two partners equally share power.

• Love is like History: Events of relationship form an indelible record; keep a lot of records-mental or physical.

• Love is Horror: Relationships become interesting when you terrorise or are terrorised by your partner.

• Like is like a House and Home: Relationships have their core in the home, through its development and maintenance.

• Love is Humour: Love is strange and funny.

• Love is a Mystery: Love is a mystery and you should not let too much of yourself be known.

• Love is like a Police: You’ve got to keep close tabs on your partner to make sure he/she toes the line, or you need to be under surveillance to make sure you behave.

• Love is like Pornography: Love is dirty, and to love is to degrade or be degraded.

• Love is a Recovery: Survivor mentality; view that after past trauma, person can get through practically anything.

• Love is like Religion: Either views love as a religion, or love as a set of feelings and activities dictated by religion.

• Love is a Sacrifice: To love is to give of oneself or for someone to give of him or herself to you.

• Love is Science: Love can be understood, analysed, and dissected, just like any other natural phenomenon.

• Love is a Science Fiction: Feeling that partner is like an alien-incomprehensible and very strange.

• Love is like Sewing: Love is whatever you make it.

• Love is a Theatre: Love is scripted, with predictable acts, scenes, and lines and drama.

• Love is like a Travel: Love is a journey one undertakes and is like a journey too.

• Love is like War: Love is a series of battles in a devastating but continuing war.

• Love is a Student-teacher: Love is a relationship like that between a student and a teacher, one knows it all and the other must be taught.

Every day, there are people falling in love, dying for love, killing for love, heartbroken because of love and living because of love. But thousands of years later, love still stays as allusive and alluring as ever. There are more than 100 million love songs and countless stories, ballads, poems, movies on love.

Prof Chavi Bhargava Sharma, a PHD in Psychology,is the Founder and CEO of Indic Center for Psychological Wellness and Holistic Health and Conversationists-Talking Cues.

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