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Women at helm: Navigating growth & Excellence

It is always intriguing to see how societal boundaries have limited the very definitions of leadership, growth, and the ecosystems, we may need culturally to ensure a non-biased approach for overall growth? What makes an entrepreneur, who we consider an entrepreneur and the breakdown of enterprise and enterprising are still chained by very strong gender […]

It is always intriguing to see how societal boundaries have limited the very definitions of leadership, growth, and the ecosystems, we may need culturally to ensure a non-biased approach for overall growth?
What makes an entrepreneur, who we consider an entrepreneur and the breakdown of enterprise and enterprising are still chained by very strong gender biases of society, major decision makers, governments, institutions and world leaders.
In the Indian context, Government of India through its programs has significantly aided small women business owners by giving them access to cheap and easily accessible capital, connecting them with potential customers, helping them upskill and markets, building their capacities, promoting financial literacy, and giving them access to simple microcredit facilities.
There is a running thread between stories of – access to education, resources, assets, land, and family, social and economic support. Secondly, economic independence and full autonomy to make choices that involve their lives, children, family, communities etc.
What remains an alarming concern is an enormous amount of talent remaining untapped and its impact on the global economy. Basis surveys and researches, the main obstacles include structural disadvantages, the prevalence of women in unorganized economic systems, gender based occupational segregation, discrimination throughout the recruitment drives, promotion and retaining process, and reentry chains in formal employment; gender pay gaps, lack of assets, unequal and inadequate access to productive resources, capacity building and finance, as well as a heavy and disproportionate burden of unpaid care, domestic work and sexual harassment at work.
Needless to mention, that complex challenges need complex solutions. Some of these includes programs that do not just aim at inclusion but transformation.
Gender inequality is a key factor that hinders progress towards sustainable development and the achievement of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, as it affects the potential of women and girls to contribute to, and benefit from, development results. But how? It stems from limiting access to education, healthcare, and employment opportunities, which further affects the economic and social development of communities. In addition, gender inequality often leads to harmful traditional practices and a lack of access to legal services, including protection from violence. These social norms can have long-term consequences on the well-being of individuals, families, and communities.
Conversely, the full and equal participation and contribution of women in all aspects of society, research has shown that when women are empowered, their increased economic participation can lead to increased economic growth, improved health outcomes, and increased access to education. Numbers do not lie! Here is a shocking fact to reflect on, if female employment was at par with male employment, GDP could rise everywhere by a huge margin.

 

 


Nishtha Satyam, the youngest woman to ever head a UN body, is a passionate advocate for sustainable development, inclusive growth and creating a more gender equal society.

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