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UK Elections: What Happened In The 2019 Polls?

In December 2019, the UK elections has dramatically altered the nation’s political future. The Conservative Party, under the leadership of Boris Johnson, triumphed with a substantial gain, securing 365 seats—a notable increase of 48 seats from the previous 2017 election. The Conservatives garnered 43.6% of the total vote, up from 42.3%, marking their most significant […]

UK Elections: What Happened In The 2019 Polls?
UK Elections: What Happened In The 2019 Polls?

In December 2019, the UK elections has dramatically altered the nation’s political future. The Conservative Party, under the leadership of Boris Johnson, triumphed with a substantial gain, securing 365 seats—a notable increase of 48 seats from the previous 2017 election. The Conservatives garnered 43.6% of the total vote, up from 42.3%, marking their most significant parliamentary majority since the era of Margaret Thatcher.

In stark contrast, the Labour Party, led by Jeremy Corbyn, suffered a significant defeat. They managed to win only 202 seats with 32.1% of the vote, down from 262 seats and 40.0% in 2017. The decline was most pronounced in Labour’s traditional strongholds, where Brexit divisions and dissatisfaction with Corbyn’s leadership played pivotal roles.

Other parties experienced mixed results. The Liberal Democrats increased their vote share to 11.5% from 7.4%, yet they lost one seat, ending up with 11 seats. The Scottish National Party (SNP) saw substantial gains, winning 48 seats, an increase of 13 seats.

This election was crucial for the Brexit negotiations. Boris Johnson’s pledge to “Get Brexit done” resonated particularly well with voters in areas that had strongly supported the Leave campaign in the 2016 referendum. The decisive Conservative victory enabled Johnson to pursue his Brexit agenda, aiming for the UK’s departure from the European Union by January 31, 2020.

Voter turnout saw a slight decline, dropping from 68.8% in 2017 to 67.3%. Regional variations in turnout were notable, with the South West recording the highest at 72.0% and Northern Ireland the lowest at 61.8%. The 2019 election was also significant as it was the first December poll since 1923.

The election’s aftermath brought significant political consequences. Jeremy Corbyn announced his resignation as Labour leader following internal party criticism and the loss of seats in traditional Labour areas. Conversely, the SNP’s success reignited calls for a second Scottish independence referendum, sparking intense debate about the future of the UK’s constitutional structure.

The 2019 UK elections provided a clear mandate for Brexit and reshaped the parliamentary dynamics. It highlighted shifts in voter loyalty, significant losses for Labour, and a resurgence of nationalist sentiment in Scotland.

The next UK election is scheduled to be held in 4 July, 2024.

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2019 PollsTDGThe Conservative PartyThe Daily GuardianUK elections