'The pandemic has shown us that we are all deeply connected': Jamie Metzl, founder and chair of One Shared World - The Daily Guardian
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‘The pandemic has shown us that we are all deeply connected’: Jamie Metzl, founder and chair of One Shared World

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Jamie Metzl, founder and chair of One Shared World and Shagun Sethi, Co Leader at One Shared World recently joined NewsX for an insightful conversation as part of its special series NewsX India A-List and shared their vision of an interdependent world, which is rooted at the core of One Shared World.

Speaking about One Shared World, its movement and what is it stands for, Jamie said, “If this virus and this terrible pandemic has shown us anything then it is that we are all deeply connected. Although there are some people who calling for building walls to protect people, we realise that we are all one humanity sharing this same planet. If we don’t come together to solve these kind of big global problems then we will get what we have, which is everybody suffering, every country suffering on its own. That was the big realization that others and I had in the earliest days of the pandemic. That the pandemic wasn’t just its own problem, it was the manifestation of a much bigger problem and that problem is that our species has very rapidly grown from a bunch of small mans of roaming nomads to this big global species with the ability to fundamentally transform or even end all of life on earth. Now we share all of these big global problems but while we have a structure for addressing our national problems, we don’t have sufficient structure for coming together to address our global problems. The way we believe that we can do that is by building an empowered global constituency, not of people who reject their countries but of people who love their countries, love the United Nations but believe that we need to have a group of people, an empowered constituency that is demanding that our common needs as humans sharing the same planet be met and that movement is what One Shared World is all about.”

When asked about the origin of One Shared World and whether it was the pandemic that made him come up with this idea, Jamie shared, “In the earliest days of the pandemic, I was invited to give a talk for Singularity University, on which I am on the faculty, which is like a University of the future. My book ‘Hacking Darwin: Genetic Engineering and the future of Humanity’ had just come out. I am an advisor to the World Health Organisation on Genetic Engineering and my talk was supposed to be about whether the tools of Genetic revolution are a match for the pandemic but that morning I woke up and I realized that there was a much bigger issue at play. Yes, we weren’t prepared for this pandemic. We were also not prepared for any pandemic so we were not able to respond to any of our big global challenges like climate change or ecosystem destruction or proliferating weapons of mass destruction. I felt that there was a through-line between all of those things, which is our inability as global species to solve global problems.

I gave that talk and I said what I said moments ago- we need to build and empower global constituency. That talk went viral. I stayed up all night and I drafted ‘Declaration of Interdependence’, put that up on my personal Jamie Metzl website. That went viral and I started to realise something bigger was happening.  Here there were people all around the world who were identifying this same problem so I called a global meeting. We had, in our first meeting, about 130 people from 25 countries, including India and we decided that we needed to come together to build this. That was in April-May. On May 6th, we launched and we are now a community of people in 112 countries working together. Our declaration of interdependence has been translated into 19 languages, including Hindi, Tibetan and English. We are racing forward with major initiatives and amazing group of volunteers,” he added.

Having been one of the first people to be a part of One Shared World and embracing the volunteer spirit, Shagun expressed,I think what is really exceptional about One Shared World is that all of us acknowledge that we have a unique moment that we are in and a unique opportunity. This pandemic has exposed these different cleavages of inequality across the world and it has brought us to the point where we have to now think that we have a chance to rewrite the future and a chance to think about what is coming next. We can build back and we can build back better. That is the spirit that brings people from all across the world together to work for One Shared World.”

She added, “One of the things that I am proudest of, which is the the heart and soul of our community, is our young leaders program so we have a coordinator group with over 50 coordinators from across 10 countries, including Africa, India, across the Europe, across the US, across Canada and all of these young people, who are in high school, universities, master, PHD students, there are all here because they believe that we as a youth have something to say and we want to take control of what is coming next. But that is not limited to the youth. We have members from top leadership to our entire volunteer base and it is completely on a non-paid Volunteer basis and that is just because we believe. We believe that there is better to come and we believe that we have something better to do with that. That is absolutely special.”

Reflecting on his journey and how it has led him to One Shared World,Jamie revealed, “I am the son of a refugee. My father and grandparents came to the United States after WWII, fleeing lives that were absolutely destroyed by Nazism. For me, that has always been a part of who I am and my core fundamental belief is that any society is only as safe as the most vulnerable people in that society. For me and all the work that I have done, both in the field of human rights and in thinking about where the world is heading as a futurist, that’s the job, it’s not just about imagining things for its own sake. It is trying to imagine where we are going, what are the implications of our most powerful technologies and how can we make sure that we use our most cherished values to guide the application of our most powerful technologies and that was why it wasn’t just my work in human rights and government that made me recognize that we need to build these kinds of more stable, more resilient solutions to our problems by empowering people. It was also through working with the WHO on future of genetic engineering. We now have these tools that will fundamentally transform life on earth and the question for us is will we use those tools wisely. We would not be able to make those kinds of decisions with just a few scientists and a few experts. Our world is democratizing, power is decentralizing and if we don’t take our next big steps forward together then everything we have built past decades and centuries could be lost. “

Highlighting the role of Indian youth in mitigating the challenges that we face as humanity, Shagun added, “Growing up as an Indian girl is a unique experience because we are constantly thinking about our safety, we are constantly thinking about what it means to be a woman. I think that this is my reason for working in human rights, that I had the privilege to go to sleep thinking that I can wake up and be safe. It is something that all women deserve. That got completely exasperated when I got into the US to do my masters. That’s where I was a brown Indian girl and a brown woman. That’s when my identity became evident. I very strongly believe that India’s superpower is its youth because we have something to say and there is something to be done. The one thing that I love about One Shared World is that it’s youth component is not tokenistic. We are at the table, from the get go. We are there to plan, implement, do all the social media, talk about it and that is what is special. I strongly believe that we as a youth have something needs to be said, we have a voice that is inclusive and we have the power in us to bring about a change. One Shared World is a platform to really bring that change. I invite all of India’s youth.”

Summing up with some of One Shared World’s recent initiatives, Jamie said, “One of our biggest initiatives is our initiative on water sanitation hygiene and protection. Gandhiji showed us all the way, that we need to have a big vision and that we need to empower people at all levels to realise that vision. We have been working with everybody at all levels from national governments and we certainly had a very close alliance and partnership with the Indian government, with ministers like Suresh Prabhu and others, with society groups and others, calling for world leaders and the world to come together to guarantee that everyone on earth has access to clean water, basic sanitation, hygiene and essential pandemic protection by 2030. We were thrilled when G20 leaders included the essence of the language, which we had provided in their leaders final communicae released in November from Riyadh. We believe that this is creates a big foundation but we are now working very actively at all levels to guarantee that everybody has access to these basic ingredients of a safe and dignified life. Not because it is charity, not because it’s wealthiest people are helping poorest people but because the essence of interdependence is that your safety is my safety. If the most vulnerable people on earth are more susceptible to pandemic like Covid-19, it is not just bad for them but bad for all of us.”

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Remote work has been our culture from day one: Vipul Amler, Founder, Saeloun

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Vipul Amler, Founder, Saeloun recently joined us for an insightful conversation as part of NewsX India A-List. Before diving deeper into his company Saeloun, Vipul introduced himself as saying, “I am a software developer, who works on web and mobile applications. We primarily use technology called Ruby On Rails and React JS, which are used by major companies like Facebook, Flipkart, Instagram and so forth. I have been in this industry for the last decade or so. At the same time, I also have written books on the same. Other than that, recently I have also been doing small angel investments.”

Talking about Saeloun and his journey to start the company, Vipul shared, “This is my second company in the last couple of years. Saeloun was started as a way for being a company, which is employee owned as well as having a very open transparent culture. We started off with that so that employees have more input in the growth and so forth. Saeloun specialises in the same thing- Ruby On Rails and React.Js and we help a bunch of different clients in various fields from e-commerce, healthcare and so forth. That was the primary purpose of starting Saeloun. “

When asked about the services they offer and their primary clientele, he responded, “Many clients, which are established clients, they contact us and reach out to us for our expertise on Ruby On Rails and React.Js, which I use for building applications. Like you might have seen Airbnb or Amazon or Flipkart. We help them to build the web applications. We also have expertise in helping them build mobile applications that you use. For example, if you are using PayTm or Google Pay, these kind of applications. We help our clients spread out. At the same time, when the clients were growing a lot, they come to us for helping them to scale or a bunch of different things.”

“There has been a huge growth since the last year. A lot of people last year, after the pandemic started coming up online, which for us has been a very busy time,” he added. 

Speaking about the founding principles on the basis of which he started Saeloun and what sets apart Saeloun from others in the market, Vipul said, “Profit sharing was one part of the thing. This is before the pandemic. Last year, everyone started to do work from home or remote work but we have doing or I have been doing remote work since 2011 or 2012. That was the same principle as well, which sets Saeloun apart. We have been doing remote work and remote work has been our culture from day one since we started in 2019. In terms of profit sharing, we are a services company so we provide consulting with various different companies. For employees to have more ownership in the company, that was one of the ways. Whatever profits we have, we actually announce them publicly as well and share the financial data with everyone, so that they are aware of how we are doing and also equitably distribute 25% of all of our profits with our employees.”

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ELVISA COSMETICS LAUNCHED TO PROVIDE PERSONALISED BEAUTY EXPERIENCE

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Renowned International model Elvisa has recently launched her new venture Elvisa cosmetics. Elvisa revealed she’s been working on the brand for the past few years and that her friends and family have been testing out the products. Amongst its many firsts, the Elvisa Cosmetics offers an innovative range of different makeup products including different shades of foundations, lipsticks, primer, and other beauty essentials where you can mix and match to create your desired signature shade in trendy tones. Besides personalised skincare consultations from beauty advisors, the brand also offers mini makeovers and makeup tutorials by Elvisa that consist of diamond lips, smokey eyes, charcoal glitter lids, golden glam eye shadow, sculpt and contour, tips to get perfect eyebrows and iconic eyeliner looks. The various categories of products have been divided into convenient sections enabling shoppers to pick their favourites with ease. Commenting on the launch, Elvisa, CEO, Elvisa Cosmetics said, “We are thrilled to launch our first-ever cosmetic range for the most diverse women across the world. We are extremely delighted with the response we are getting for our unique products. With this launch we are also unlocking the potential of our online store to create an endless aisle shopping experience for our loyal customers and deepen our bond with them.” Currently, she has an online family of 721K followers on her Instagram page. She loves to experiment with her clothes, it’s colour shades. She loves to travel and keeps her social media handle regularly updates about her whereabouts. She loves pink, black and brown colours and we can see her trying on different attires of these particular shades. The latter has earlier been seen on various fashion runways and shows flaunting her unique clothing style and walk. She started her journey on Instagram, a photo and video sharing online app which has given a breakthrough to numerous fashion icons. “I wanted to start my own cosmetics line because I want to build my own unique brand and leave a legacy behind. My goal wasn’t to always wear brands, it was to become one.”

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Marks & Spencer showcases India Festive Fusion collection

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Celebrating the festive season in style, the iconic British brand Marks & Spencer presented their latest collection, India special occasion wear in a fashion show in New Delhi. Bollywood celebrity Neha Dhupia was seen on the ramp as the showstopper, who looked stunning as ever. The new mom was mesmerising in a deep green embroidered round neck dress with contrast colour paisley print. Accompanying her on the ramp was her handsome actor husband Angad Bedi, looking dapper in velvet teal peak label blazer, black shirt and versatile dark trousers from the new occasion wear collection. Neha, who delivered a baby boy earlier this month, looked tres chic in the India Festive Fusion collection. The actor, being the popular body positive advocate, chose a relaxed fit dress and walked the ramp with no qualms about her post-partum body. Commenting on the newly launched collections, James Munson, MD, Marks & Spencer India said, “Designed in response to an increasing desire among customers for chic outfits that can work hard in their wardrobes, the latest collections can be dressed up for an occasion or paired down for daily wear. Neha looks absolutely fantastic in the collection, especially after recently welcoming her new arrival. It’s great to have her and Angad join M&S this evening,” he further added about the show and showstoppers. Talking about her association with the brand, Neha was ecstatic as she shared, “Marks & Spencer has been a constant in my wardrobe for over a decade now. From my early days, M&S was my go-to for must-haves and fashion staples, and now I am wearing their India special occasion wear. I also love the evening wear for men, like what Angad is wearing. The brand never fails to surprise and delight, and I am glad to be a part of M&S event once again.” Angad added “Evening wear for Indian men from M&S is a sartorial treat. Some pieces like the Bandgala and Bandi jackets are a great addition to their existing product range. This collection helps make dressing up for any occasion easy.” The fashion show tossed up must-have pieces like elevated flowing dresses, chic pant suits, beautiful tops on female models. Male models wore opulent velvet bandh galas, dinner jackets, waistcoats, premium shirts in rich sateen and ornate prints, exquisitely tailored trousers and top-notch polo t-shirts. The presentation also showcased a combination of smart autumn-winter, loungewear and festive fare, as a part of this special celebratory fashion repertoire.

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Drone Spraying in Sangli Sugarcane Cultivation, entrepreneur introduces new trends in MH Agriculture

Social impact entrepreneur Prateek Patil has implemented a line of drone technology for spraying fertilisers which has already covered 3,200 acres of sugarcane area benefiting over 2,000 farmers in Walwa, Sangli.

Sangli District has been grounds for pioneering agriculture and irrigation works in Western Maharashtra. From the cooperative movement to drip irrigation, innovation has been a sign of the cultivation in the region. The drone spraying technology introduced by Prateek and adopted by the Rajarambapu Sugar Factory in Sangli in 2020-2021 has not only reduced time and efforts of the farmers but also increasedprofitability. To launch this initiative, Prateek conducted 22 ‘Shetkari Parisamvads’ where he met over 4,900 farmers to incept the idea and talk about the benefits of this technology. According to him, “acceptance to new methods is often the most difficult step in the Indian agricultural landscape, and to get their willingness to try new schemes is one of the challenging parts.”

Prateek has been involved with agro-innovation and has conducted several initiatives to aid and propagate drip irrigation. These meetings across Sangli propelled the conversation and attracted many farmers to come and test out the drone technology.

SAVING TIME, MONEY AND WATER

Conventionally the farmer sprays his crops physically. Even with hired manual labour, this is a costly and time-consuming affair. In the manual spraying method, for one-acre sugarcane, a farmer would spend around Rs 1000 on spraying labour charges along with 200 L water and a higher quantity of chemicals.

To address these problems, coupled with the lack of labourers during Covid-19, Prateek decided to introduce this technique. He took it upon himself to test the technology and setup a partnership with a regional manufacturing company. The drones are given out on rent at very affordable rates saving almost 40% of total costs. It utilises only 10 L water, saving almost 150 L. Also, now it takes only 5-10 mins to spray fertilisers and permitted pesticides on one acre of sugarcane as opposed to 4-5 hours earlier. Crops at any height can be effectively reached and 4 nozzles guarantee a comprehensive and equal distribution of fertilisers and pesticides.

It is flexible across climate conditions and allows for uniform spraying of entire fields. A reduction of 25-50% in the quantity of fertilisers and pesticides used has been observed after adapting drone spraying and the quality of yield of crops has been found to increase by 20-30%, which has resulted in more income.

GENERATING EMPLOYMENT

Use of this drone technology also has an additional advantage of generating employment for the local youth in manufacturing and operations. The Sugar Factory has partnered with a company called Chatak Innovations for assembling and operating drones. Labour force hiring for the drone operation facility like Drone Pilots & Co-Pilots, Cars & Drivers for the drone’s transport and the supervision team is facilitated under the leadership of Prateek. Employment numbers for assembling and operating is expected to increase as more farmers adopt drone technology.

Currently, the factory uses a 10 L Octocopter drone. After conducting an initial pilot, this technology is being introduced on a greater scale to farmers of the region. Till date, over 3,200 acres of area have been covered by drone spraying benefiting over 2000 farmers of the region. Each drone is currently covering 9 to 12 acres in a day and this is a first-of-its-kind exercise conducted by a sugar factory in Maharashtra, stated Vikas Deshmukh, Director, Vasantdada Sugar Institute.

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Social impact entrepreneur Prateek Patil has implemented a line of drone technology for spraying fertilisers which has already covered 3,200 acres of sugarcane area benefiting over 2,000 farmers in Walwa, Sangli.

Sangli District has been grounds for pioneering agriculture and irrigation works in Western Maharashtra. From the cooperative movement to drip irrigation, innovation has been a sign of the cultivation in the region. The drone spraying technology introduced by Prateek and adopted by the Rajarambapu Sugar Factory in Sangli in 2020-2021 has not only reduced time and efforts of the farmers but also increasedprofitability. To launch this initiative, Prateek conducted 22 ‘Shetkari Parisamvads’ where he met over 4,900 farmers to incept the idea and talk about the benefits of this technology. According to him, “acceptance to new methods is often the most difficult step in the Indian agricultural landscape, and to get their willingness to try new schemes is one of the challenging parts.”

Prateek has been involved with agro-innovation and has conducted several initiatives to aid and propagate drip irrigation. These meetings across Sangli propelled the conversation and attracted many farmers to come and test out the drone technology.

SAVING TIME, MONEY AND WATER

Conventionally the farmer sprays his crops physically. Even with hired manual labour, this is a costly and time-consuming affair. In the manual spraying method, for one-acre sugarcane, a farmer would spend around Rs 1000 on spraying labour charges along with 200 L water and a higher quantity of chemicals.

To address these problems, coupled with the lack of labourers during Covid-19, Prateek decided to introduce this technique. He took it upon himself to test the technology and setup a partnership with a regional manufacturing company. The drones are given out on rent at very affordable rates saving almost 40% of total costs. It utilises only 10 L water, saving almost 150 L. Also, now it takes only 5-10 mins to spray fertilisers and permitted pesticides on one acre of sugarcane as opposed to 4-5 hours earlier. Crops at any height can be effectively reached and 4 nozzles guarantee a comprehensive and equal distribution of fertilisers and pesticides.

It is flexible across climate conditions and allows for uniform spraying of entire fields. A reduction of 25-50% in the quantity of fertilisers and pesticides used has been observed after adapting drone spraying and the quality of yield of crops has been found to increase by 20-30%, which has resulted in more income.

GENERATING EMPLOYMENT

Use of this drone technology also has an additional advantage of generating employment for the local youth in manufacturing and operations. The Sugar Factory has partnered with a company called Chatak Innovations for assembling and operating drones. Labour force hiring for the drone operation facility like Drone Pilots & Co-Pilots, Cars & Drivers for the drone’s transport and the supervision team is facilitated under the leadership of Prateek. Employment numbers for assembling and operating is expected to increase as more farmers adopt drone technology.

Currently, the factory uses a 10 L Octocopter drone. After conducting an initial pilot, this technology is being introduced on a greater scale to farmers of the region. Till date, over 3,200 acres of area have been covered by drone spraying benefiting over 2000 farmers of the region. Each drone is currently covering 9 to 12 acres in a day and this is a first-of-its-kind exercise conducted by a sugar factory in Maharashtra, stated Vikas Deshmukh, Director, Vasantdada Sugar Institute.

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MINISTERS LAUD JGU AS 1ST UNIVERSITY TO RELEASE UN-SDG REPORT 2021

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On the occasion of the United Nations Day 2021, O.P. Jindal Global University released the first-of-its-kind Implementing the Sustainable Development Goals: Role of Universities and Civil Society in Protecting the Environment Report, mapping its compliance towards the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set by the United Nations.

Setting a global benchmark, O.P. Jindal Global University has become one of the first universities to fully commit to and implement the SDGs on its campus, despite the challenges posed by the Covid-19 pandemic.

The report was launched in the presence of Dharmendra Pradhan, Union Minister of Education, Ashwini Kumar Choubey, Union Minister of State for Environment, Professor (Dr.) Pankaj Mittal, Secretary General Association of Indian Universities, Atul Bagai, Head of Country Office United Nations Environment Programme and Sudhir Mishra, Founder & Managing Partner, Trust Legal, Advocates & Consultants.

The UN SDGs include affordable and sustainable energy, combating climate change, eradicating hunger, education, health, and gender equality.

To demonstrate its commitment towards the implementation of the SDGs, O.P. Jindal Global University engaged in an independent assessment of its campus and initiatives to get a transparent and fair view of the university’s progress in compliance with the UN SDGs.

A cohort of 12 assessors from the environment and legal fields including The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI), Trust Legal, Advocates & Consultants and Mazars Business Advisors Pvt. Ltd., Trust Legal, Advocates & Consultants carried out a rigorous evaluation of the university’s processes ranging from the university’s energy consumption to water management systems and community engagement initiatives.

Pradhan said, “The launch of the report comes at an opportune moment when the world leaders including Prime Minister Narendra Modi will attend COP26 meeting at Glasgow next month. Diverse voices in the form of reports, scientific inquiry, and debates will only enrich our collective knowledge in protecting the health of the planet.”

“Universities have responsibility to contribute not only to the local communities but also to the global community. This is primarily because they have the capacity to help students develop a holistic understanding of how a wide range of local, national and global challenges can be addressed. The role of universities in the road to sustainable development is crucial. It becomes imperative that the universities devote time and resources to create an SDG-ready generation that remains focused on the mission to achieve sustainable development,” he added.

Choubey said, “I congratulate the Vice-Chancellor of JGU that under his leadership, JGU is not only committed to excellence in education but has also demonstrated a vision to implement the UN-SDG goals at the university. Educational institutions can play a pivotal role in informing young people and create awareness about the steps needed to protect and preserve the environment.”

Kumar said, “The Sustainability Development Report 2021 demonstrates our commitment to creating a green and socially-conscious campus and to have a transparent and fair view of our progress in our compliance with the UN SDGs. JGU has moved towards a healthier and safer environment by implementing the SDGs within its campus. By taking efforts to implement the UN-SDGs, JGU has shown the way to other educational institutions, how futuristic, social and environmental commitments are met.”

Setting the context for why universities must play a role in implementing SDGs, Bagai said, “Today, we are all facing ‘the triple planetary crisis’. It is the crisis of climate, the crisis of nature, and the crisis of pollution and waste. The crisis is very clearly a consequence of the economic path that we have pursued along with resource-intensive processes, consequent lifestyle changes due to economic growth and urbanisation. It is a rare feat for a university not only in south Asia or in Asia Pacific to have come up with such a report. It’s an extremely laudable effort which will be a game-changer. We should make it available to every university in the country.”

O.P. Jindal Global University has created a sustainable model with solar power generation by contributing excess power to the grid. The university has aimed in instituting zero-net emission policies and investing in on-campus renewable energy production by developing long-term resource efficiency and management plans. Close to 55% of the university’s campus is under a green cover. A green area around the university helps to arrest the effects of particulate matter and gaseous pollutants in the area besides playing a major role in environmental conservation efforts.

The university has also set up the Jindal School of Environment and Sustainability to ensure that it creates innovation and young leadership to combat climate change and its impact. It also provides interdisciplinary education across other schools to ensure that there is adequate awareness on this important subject across the entire university.

Professor Pankaj Mittal, Secretary General Association of Indian Universities said, “We do realise that India is placed at 120th rank in implementation of SDG 2021 and this calls for urgent action from all sectors of the society. Due to their unique position in society, the higher education institutions have immense scope and potential to contribute towards realising all 17 SDGs and thereby accomplishing them. I feel that rather realising the SDGs without the cooperation of the higher education sector is quite an impossible task. In India, there is a lot of tacit contribution of HEIs in implementing SDGs, but there is no documented data on the same.”

Professor Dabiru Sridhar Patnaik, Registrar, O.P. Jindal Global University (JGU) gave the concluding address and said, “We have taken a step in the right direction towards promoting the significance of UN-SGDs by progressively undertaking activities to meet the goals in consonance with the National Education Policy. I am also happy to report that most recently we have opened a student chapter of the International Green Building Campus under the aegis of the Confederation of Indian Industry. A very futuristic and a definite step has been taken to create a green campus.”

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Took conscious effort to start taking out time for myself: Akanksha Singh

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Akanksha Singh, Dance Content Creator, recently joined us for a fun conversation as part of our special series of NewsX Influencer A-list. In the exclusive interview, she opened up about what brought her into the world of dancing and much more. Read excerpts:

When asked what brought her into the world of dancing and creating content, she said, “I have always been very fond of dance, but especially during the pandemic last year in March 2020, I just wanted to do something constructive with my time and involve my children also. It just happened by chance that I came across these shuffling videos on TikTok. I got very curious as to how it could be done actually, so I just started doing them. It was so amazing because of the positive impact it started having on my body as well as making me stress free. All in all, it was very positive. I got into it and I never got out of it then really.”

Speaking about the moment she started calling herself as a dance influencer and inspirer, she said, “I have no idea what I was doing when I started out. It took a lot of courage to put up dance videos on Instagram. I had a very small community at that time like 400 followers or so, you know, it was all my close friends. I thought I could share a little bit with them, just to motivate everybody to be active and not to very stressed during the pandemic and do something constructive with their time. This pause that life gave us, that god had given us, was to make the most constructive use of it. When I went viral, people started saying you are so inspiring and you have made me go back to dance, you have made me go back to my workouts, you have made me start working out. I am a mother of two. A woman came up to tell me that even I am a mother of two and I left dancing, I left painting, I left my working out, I’ve never taken out time for myself because for us women, we tend to put our families first, we tend to put our children first, everything is about them. She also took time to spoke about how she handles society judgement on following her passion.”

“I was doing the same thing, I was putting my family before myself any time. It was all about them. My kids school time, my husband’s office time, my in-law’s meal times and certain requirements here and there. By the time it came to me, I was too tired. It took a very conscious effort for me to actually start taking out time for myself first in the morning, take care of my exercise and make a routine for myself,” she added. 

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