PRESIDENT TRUMP IS A FAILED LEADER: ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER - The Daily Guardian
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PRESIDENT TRUMP IS A FAILED LEADER: ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER

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LOS ANGELES: Hollywood star Arnold Schwarzenegger has condemned the attack on the Capitol in the US, and described Donald Trump as the worst president ever. The former Governor of California also compared the mob that attacked the US Capitol to the Nazis. in a seven-minute video, which was posted on Schwarzenegger’s Twitter account late on Sunday, the actor compared the events to 1938’s Kristallnacht. “As an immigrant to this country, I would like to say a few words to my fellow Americans, and to our friends around the world about the events of recent days. i grew up in Austria,” he began. “I’m very aware of Kristallnacht, or the Night of broken Glass. it was night of rampage against the Jews carried out in 1938 by the Nazi equivalent of the Proud boys. Wednesday was the Day of broken Glass right here in the United States. The broken glass was in the windows of the United States Capitol. But the mob did not just shatter the windows of the Capitol, they shattered the ideas we took for granted,” he added. The actor continued: “They did not just break down the doors of the building that housed American democracy; they trampled the very principles on which our country was founded. i grew up in the ruins of a country that suffered the loss of its democracy. “i was born in 1947, two years after the Second World War. Growing up, i was surrounded by broken men drinking away the guilt over their participation in the most evil regime in history. Not all of them were rabid anti-Semites or Nazis, many just went along, step-by-step, down the road. They were the people next-door.” “Now, I’ve never shared this so publicly because it is a painful memory. but my father would come home drunk once or twice a week and he would scream and hit us and scare my mother,” Schwarzenegger said. “I didn’t hold him totally responsible because our neighbour was doing the same thing to his family, and so was the next neighbour over. i heard it with my ears and saw it with my own eyes,” he said. He recalled how his father and neighbours had been left troubled by their memories of a war.

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Cardi B turns heads in red futuristic-looking dress

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Washington [US], January 23 (ANI): American rapper Cardi B during a shopping trip with husband Offset on Friday (local time) turned heads in a red, sheer futuristic-looking dress.
According to E! News, the 28-year-old star was accompanied by her husband and fellow rapper Offset and Cardi and even posted a photo of her posing in the risque outfit on her Instagram page. She captioned it, “Majin Buu & Goku,” which was a reference to ‘Dragon Ball’ characters.
While shopping at the Bottega Veneta boutique in Los Angeles the “WAP” rapper wore a red, futuristic-looking 3/4-length body-hugging Pierre-Louis Auvray dress with a semi-sheer design that showed off dark thong underwear and contained thick white piping and a white wool short-sleeve top.
She paired the look with red stiletto sandals, red sunglasses, a red face mask, and gold nail polish.
As per E! News, her husband Offset also posted a picture of him and his wife holding hands on his Instagram page, as well as videos of her modelling her elaborate ensemble. (ANI)

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Early life experiences effects neurobiological health

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Philadelphia [US], January 23 (ANI): A new study suggests that early life experiences can lead to an outsized effect on brain development and neurobiological health, these effects can be passed down to subsequent generations.
The study appears in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, published by Elsevier. It reports that the infant children of mothers who had experienced childhood emotional neglect displayed altered brain circuitry involved in fear responses and anxiety.
Lead author of the study, Cassandra Hendrix, PhD, Department of Psychology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA, said, “These results show that our brain development is not only shaped by what happens in our own lives but is also impacted by things that happened to our parents before we were even conceived.”
Dr Hendrix and her colleagues studied 48 Black mother-infant pairs starting in the first trimester of pregnancy. Mothers were given a questionnaire to assess childhood trauma (experiences of early abuse or neglect). The mothers were also evaluated for current, prenatal stress levels, and anxiety and depression. One month after birth, infants underwent a brain scan using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, a non-invasive technology that could be used while the babies slept naturally.
“These remarkable results leverage our ability to image the brain and its functioning very early in life,” said Cameron Carter, MD, Editor of Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.
The researchers focused on brain connections between the amygdala, which is central to processing fearful emotions, and two other brain regions: the prefrontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex. Both areas play a key role in regulating emotions. Babies whose mothers experienced childhood emotional neglect had stronger functional connections between the amygdala and the cortical regions.
After controlling for mothers’ current stress levels, the researchers found that the more emotional neglect a mother had experienced during her own childhood, the more strongly her baby’s amygdala was connected to the frontal cortical regions. Physical abuse or neglect of the mother was not correlated with the stronger connectivity. The findings suggest that childhood emotional neglect has intergenerational effects on brain structure and function.
The significance of the stronger connection remains unclear, said, Dr Hendrix. “The neural signature we observed in the 1-month-old infants of emotionally neglected mothers may be a mechanism that leads to increased risk for anxiety, or it could be a compensatory mechanism that promotes resilience in case the infant has less supportive caregivers.
In either case, emotional neglect from a mother’s own childhood seems to leave behind a neural signature in her baby that may predispose the infant to more readily detect a threat in the environment almost from birth. Our findings highlight the importance of emotional support early in life, even for subsequent generations.”
“The findings add to evidence of the intergenerational consequences of early life adversity, such as maternal neglect,” added Dr Carter. “Future studies that follow children longitudinally will help us understand the functional significance of these changes in brain function in terms of the emotional and social development of children of mothers who experienced early neglect.” (ANI)

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Organisational, individual capacity to change may reduce burnout of health care workforce

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Washington [US], January 23 (ANI): New research found that health care professionals with a greater personal ability to respond to change experienced lower rates of burnout when their work environments offered strong communication, teamwork, and leadership support.
This is one of the first studies to look at both individual responses to change and organisational capacity for change and how these factors affect burnout among health care professionals. Understanding the causes of burnout and factors that can protect against it can help improve the quality of life for the health care workforce and quality of care for patients.
Dr Debora Goldberg led the study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. Goldberg is an expert in primary care practice transformation, patient experience, and care for the underserved, with her current and upcoming research, focused on workplace health and wellbeing.
“We know that health care work environments and job demands have a profound effect on the health and well-being of those delivering care, and they may even influence the quality of health care received by patients,” explains Goldberg.
“Especially as our health care professionals and systems are being pushed to the limit in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, it is imperative that we are more aware of the influences of the work environment and job demands on health care professionals’ health and well-being.”
Goldberg and colleagues surveyed 1,279 individuals in 154 primary care practices in Virginia. They measured the practices’ capacity for change, individuals’ change readiness, hours worked per week, and burnout.
Participants were part of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Heart of Virginia Healthcare (HVH) collaborative, which supported these practices with transformation and implementation of evidence-based cardiovascular care as they made major changes in operations and employee roles.
Burnout was measured with a single question on whether the health care professionals were experiencing burnout, a measure previously validated and used in workplace studies. Individual change readiness was measured with the Change Diagnostic Index(CDI), which was developed by Dr Victoria Grady in Mason’s School of Business.
Typically, the CDI is used in organizations that are planning for large change initiatives, and this is the first time it has been applied in primary care. The CDI measures individual attitudes toward organizational change in the areas of anxiety, frustration, delayed development, rejection of the environment, refusal to participate, withdrawal, and overall attitude.
These individual attitudes can be indicators of larger organizational issues with morale, productivity, motivation, conflict, absenteeism, turnover, and overall organisational issues. The capacity of practices to change was measured by the practice adaptive reserve (PAR) instrument, which asks about an organization’s communication, teamwork, relationship trust, leadership, work environment, adoption of innovations, and learning systems.
Consistent with their earlier work, the researchers found that providers were more likely to report burnout (25.5%) than other professionals (19.9% of clinical support staff, 17.5% of administrative staff).
Among all types of health care professionals (providers, clinical support staff, and administrative staff), both practice and individual factors were related to levels of burnout. Lower levels of burnout were reported among those who had higher scores for individual response to change as well as practices that had a higher organisational capacity for change.
As the change capacity of the practice increased, burnout in healthcare professionals decreased. As health care professionals had more positive responses to change, burnout decreased.
Higher levels of burnout were reported among those who worked more hours per week, were part of a larger practice (more than 10 clinicians) or were part of a single-speciality practice.
“We found that the capacity of the practice to change influenced the relationship between individual response to change and burnout,” added Goldberg.
“Therefore, we recommend that physician practices and health care systems implement initiatives to reduce burnout by creating positive work environments through interprofessional teamwork, employee engagement, and enhanced communication.” (ANI)

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Sara Ali Khan sets temperature soaring with new pictures from Maldives

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New Delhi [India], January 23 (ANI): Setting the temperature soaring, Bollywood’s chirpy queen Sara Ali Khan on Saturday shared another bout of pictures from her Maldives trip.
The ‘Love Aaj Kal’ actor hopped on to Instagram to share the pictures with her Instafam.
The pictures see her dressed in a light blue coloured floral swimsuit and red-tinted sunglasses.
While two pictures see her posing near a shed at the beach, another one sees her posing against a serene blue backdrop of the sea.
Using her quirky poetic style, she wrote, “Sky above, Sand below, Live in the moment- Go with the flow.”
The ‘Coolie No.1 ‘ actor had gone to Maldives for a vacation earlier this week. (ANI)

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Kareena Kapoor Khan spends a ‘good day’ with family

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New Delhi [India], January 23 (ANI): Mom-to-be Kareena Kapoor Khan spent her Saturday with her celebrity sister Karisma Kapoor, and the rest of her family.
The ‘Jab We Met’ actor shared a picture from her family get-together on her Instagram stories and termed the day as a “good day” with an Instagram sticker.
The picture sees her dressed in a comfy cotton Kurta as she poses with her sister Karisma, aunt Rima Jain and her cousins.
Karisma had also shared the picture on her Instagram sharing the family bonded over lunch on Saturday.
“Saturday afternoon pose#lunch #familylove,” she wrote in the picture.
The 40-year-old actor is seen posing seated on the sofa with Karisma and her other relatives.
The ‘Chameli’ actor is currently expecting her second child with her actor husband Saif Ali Khan. (ANI)

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US talk show legend Larry King passes away at 87

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Washington [US], January 23 (ANI): American award-winning TV and radio host Larry King, who became a household name after hosting CNN’s insanely popular show ‘Larry King Live’, passed away on Saturday at the age of 87 after enduring a battle with the COVID-19 for weeks.
The beloved host died on Saturday morning at Cedars-Sinai Medical Centre in Los Angeles, reported Fox News. The news of Larry’s demise was confirmed by a statement posted online by his company, Ora Media on the late star’s official Twitter handle.
The statement read, “With profound sadness, Ora Media announces the death of our co-founder, host, and friend Larry King, who passed away this morning at age 87 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.”
Along with details about Larry’s life and condolences for his family, the statement further revealed that the funeral and memorial services will be announced later in co-ordination with the King family, who for now have asked for privacy at this time of grief.

Larry had reportedly been admitted to a hospital earlier this month after he was diagnosed with the novel coronavirus. His death comes after years of health problems that plagued the late star including his battles with lung and prostate cancer.
In a career spanning over six decades, Larry interviewed a staggering number of celebrities, political leaders, and public figures, including every US president from Richard Nixon to Donald Trump.
Over the years, Larry fathered five children and welcomed nine grandchildren, along with four great-grandchildren. The legendary host suffered a terrible tragedy last year when two of his children, daughter Chaia King and son Andy King, both died within three weeks of each other unexpectedly over the summer. (ANI)

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