One should always yearn to be original, not a copy - The Daily Guardian
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Spiritually Speaking

One should always yearn to be original, not a copy

Arun Malhotra

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In this world everything knows everything. Knowledge is inherent in the world. Everything knows what to be and how to be. That includes human body as well. Except human mind. Man repeatedly forgets what he is expected to be and how to be. He keeps on thinking to be something. He does not realise the inherent source of knowledge that he carries within. But creates a new identity an artificial centre that makes him off the centre. Eccentric.

Understand it like this, when a child is born, look into his eyes. He is perfectly centred. Look into eyes of a child and you will find a void looking at you. He cries with full vigour, he laughs with full vigour. He gets totally angry. He is total energy. He is in the centre.

 Then we tell him he has a name, we give him an artificial name— an identity that he borrows-a borrowed identity. When he looks at himself in the mirror and thinks the image in the mirror is the name that his parents call the image with. Slowly he begins believing in his borrowed identity. He starts believing in his possessions, he starts believing in the world around him—the make-believe world. And a new centre is born. That is born with the borrowed identity. His borrowed identity creates an artificial centre. The story begins. What Hindus call maya is an imaginary world that he creates around himself to live in it and he is lost into it forever. That’s the story of man.

Centre remains there. Void remains there. But you get stuck somewhere. He keeps on running but does not reach anywhere. Keeps on finding new milestones. Buddha said choose your yearning very carefully, because whatever that you yearn for will sooner or later be fulfilled. You yearn for money it gets fulfilled, you yearn for prestige power it will eventually come to you.

Yearning is in fact what Darwin calls evolution. Whatever you yearned you earned. Whenever you yearn you yearn change. You were a meek dog, you yearned to be a fighter dog. Yearning evolved you into a larger dog with big canines in your next births. In one life Buddha was an elephant. Many stories of the Buddha, the awakened one, being elephant are there. Once a fire erupted in jungle and it was a huge fire. The elephant also ran to save himself. He saw a big tree and stood there to relax, as the fire drew near the elephant in order to move picked his one foot up but meantime a small rabbit came and sat under his feet to relax under the tree. The elephant was filled with compassion and did not put the foot down to save the life of rabbit. In moments the elephant toppled because he could not hold his weight on three legs. Fire caught up with him and he died. Next birth the elephant was born a man. Yearning for compassion made him human the next birth.

Darwin theory is half-truth. The truth is that man continues to evolve into animals even today it depends on his yearning. It does not necessarily means because he is born a man he will always be reborn a man. It depends what you yearn for. Yogis when they meditate into their past lives after three-four lives, they find themselves in the birth of cow. This has been experienced by many. Darwin is true when he says that our bodies have evolved. When he talks of physical bodies evolving into shapes and because of their ‘yearning’ which he calls survival of the fittest. But Darwin is completely wrong when he says that man has come from monkey. Physical appearance of man might have been an adaptation of motley of animals not just monkey. But the state where life happens is beyond matter and when life ends matter does not matter.

Whole life man remains in deep slumber. His eyes are filled with yearning. When you yearn something you become self-hypnotic. You tender your hypnosis the whole life. If you have to be hypnotic towards something then don’t be hypnotic towards things like money, bungalows, cars, et al. Be hypnotic towards love, compassion or an exploration of yourself the Buddha way. But you keep on ill-advising yourself. You call it life but you don’t know whether this is life. You are moving like a zombie on auto pilot mode without knowing who is moving. You think your borrowed identity is moving you and it’s you. You mistake your borrowed identity as you.

In fact, it is the other way round. Your borrowed identity is the guise that you adorn to cover your unreal self. Because fake is always sold as genuine. If fake is sold as fake, no one will buy it. The fake to be, genuine is needed. To be unreal self, real self is needed. You are 100% real and are in the centre. But you think you are not the centre but your borrowed identity is the centre around which your entire world moves. Your world is your maya (illusion). It has nothing to do with the real world around you. But real world is real. But you have created an unreal world of maya.

The eccentricity is your problem. If you come back to the centre your eccentricity goes away. You attain to your void again. You are born out of void and go back to the void.

You have created an alter life by creating an illusion to live in it. Your mind has created an illusionary world to live in and you have plunged into a state of deep hypnosis. When death comes, you suddenly realize and pity that you have not lived the life. When death comes you want to live. You pity how you lived a life in dreams. You, therefore, fear death because it is going to take away that illusionary world from you. In a state of dreaming you have created thoughts of life, the thoughts of living your life subject to fulfilment of conditions. Conditions continue to create new conditions and you continue to follow it like a silk worm in hypnosis. Millions of dollars, or large fan following or power position do not break your hypnosis but deepen it.

Someone asked Bhikku, “What is real and what is unreal self?” Bhikku replied, “To be real breakfree. Do not avoid the void in you. In fact, you cannot avoid the void in you. That’s how false self gets created. Look at the void in you which is always staring at you from within.”

Yearn for something of real worth. That which can awaken you. That which can make you aware of the void while alive. Start with centring. Let’s begin with Hara. Hara is the centre in your body from where you come to life and you go back after dying. It is below the navel in the lower abdomen. Take a deep breath inhale and exhale. Do not take breath by your lungs but let the breath go to your stomach and let your lower abdomen expand while inhaling. Very slowly it will begin to happen effortlessly. You have started a journey towards going back to your life. If you yearn for money all your life you will end up being a poor beggar. If you yearn for power all your life you will end up being a poor slave. If you yearn for fame and prestige you will end up being in a state of ego-hypnosis. Instead turn back. Yearn for the source, go back to your source. It has infinite energy. You are born emperor, just declare it. Rejoice in your kingdom.

The author is a spiritual coach and an independent advisor on policy, governance and leadership. He can be contacted at [email protected] gmail.com.

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Health & Wellness

Kashmiri ASHA worker serves as inspiration by donating blood 28 times

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A 32-year-old woman named Bilqees Ara, an ASHA worker, has donated blood 28 times since 2012. She has served as an inspiration to others across the nation.

Bilqees, who is from the Handwara Tehsil in the Kupwara area of North Kashmir, stated that she understands the “importance of blood”.

She said that by donating a pint of blood, she not only saves a precious life but an entire family.

She began donating blood in 2012 and has since given 28 pints.

She expressed her gratitude and pride at being the saviour of so many patients in the Kashmir valley.

I’ve seen people cry helplessly as they try to get blood to save their loved ones, but I’m proud of myself because I’ve arranged blood for them as well. “I felt an inner joy after that,” she said.

In Kashmir, she is known as the “Blood Woman of Kashmir”.

She is a registered blood donor. Whenever a need arises, the officials at the Blood Bank at Handwara hospital call her and, within the shortest span of time, she makes herself available to donate blood.

Women should come forward and do this as there is nothing to be afraid of. This is to be done for society, she said. She also said that she wondered who else would do it if she refused.

If a person has blood and courage, why can’t he give it to someone else in a time of need? She asked.

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Spiritually Speaking

Balance is key to harmonious relationships

Dadi Janki

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Balance is key to harmonious relationships

Two intelligent people always fight. There will always be conflict between them because each thinks he is better than the other. However, if there is one wise person and one intelligent person, there will be no conflict because a wise person understands the importance of humility and is prepared to bow before others, honouring the other person’s virtues.
This is why we are told in Rajyoga that if there are two masters in a home, there will always be quarrelling. What is the solution? If one person becomes the master, the other has to become a child. If there is a master and a child in a home, one will give the orders and the other will obey them. If both people are giving orders, who is there to obey them? That leads to problems. Two heads will quarrel with each other because both want their opinion to be accepted. Wisdom means surrendering for the sake of creating unity. This is not surrendering out of weakness but out of honour.
Sometimes family members want to discuss something. Each member gives an opinion, and each one seems to be strong in opinion. So how do you decide which opinion to adopt? While giving an opinion, you are a master. Fine – you do not need to suppress your opinions. We should never suppress our thinking. If you have an opinion or suggestion, speak out. Suppressing our intellect is a kind of spiritual suicide.
If I suppress thoughts that come to my mind, I will not grow spiritually. So, I do not need to suppress my thinking, but I also do not need to emphasise what I think should happen. When we offer our opinions, what do we do? We do not only give our opinions; we also want our opinions to be acted on. This is because we express them using the ego of the intellect, which thinks, “I am the best.”
If I am a wise person, I give my opinion when asked, and then when the majority decides, cooperate for the sake of the majority. This is common sense. If there are ten people involved, each person’s opinion cannot be acted upon. When we are wise, we find the balance between being a master and a child. When this balance is maintained, you will not have any problems because then you will get along with anyone without creating conflict. The wise person is able to interact with everyone without losing her own identity.
Having wisdom means to have both humility and also the authority of truth, ‘naram’ and ‘garam’. Only when I have both, can I be flexible. If I am only ‘garam’ I become too stiff, if I am only ‘naram’, then I become too fragile. I have both of these qualities within myself. God has given me this beautiful balance, to use in all my relations with others.
The late Dadi Janki was Administrative Head of the Brahma Kumaris.

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Spiritually Speaking

Living in the now

B.K. Usha

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Living in the now

Time, it is said, is money. Unlike money, however, lost time cannot be recovered, and in this respect, it is more valuable than money. However, a lot of people forget this and waste their time dwelling on the past or dreaming of the future.
While they are doing this, they are disconnected from the present, unaware of the passage of time and even of the things that are happening around them. This experience can leave us tired, depressed or angry if we have been thinking about something that caused a lot of hurt or was otherwise emotionally intense.
We suffer the same loss of time and energy when we worry or dream about the future. It is one thing to make plans, whereby we think of the steps we need to take to accomplish a task or cope with likely developments. But worrying, which usually involves thinking about how things might go wrong, does not help. Fear and doubt cause worry, and the result is anxiety and a feeling of helplessness, both created by imaginary situations we have dreamed up.
At the other end of the spectrum, we might fly high, riding dreams of imagined successes, until sobering reality brings us back to the present.
In all these cases precious time is lost in the present.
The past cannot be changed, and we cannot undo our misfortunes by repeatedly thinking about them. The best we can do is to identify any mistakes that were made and learn from them so that they are not repeated.
Similarly, planning is worthwhile only if the plans are acted upon. If I plan to have enough savings to buy a house, and work out all the details about how it will be painted, furnished and decorated, but never start saving money, then owning a house will remain a dream for me.
The present is the vantage point from where I can see the past and visualise the future. But my life will not move forward if I just stand there watching. I need to start acting while keeping in mind both, lessons from the past and my future goals.
There are several ways in which we can loosen the hold of the past on the mind. Whatever past event we focus on, we may need to express the feelings associated with the event, whether good or bad, before we can move on. Releasing pent up emotions can help us let go of the past and focus on the present. For this we can talk to a friend, family member or counsellor. Alternatively, we can try writing down our feelings about the past.
Even if we are dwelling on good memories, it can cause us to lose connection with the present. We may be romanticizing the past or longing for things to be the way they were, instead of focusing on how to improve our present life.
If expressing our feelings about the past does not help, we can focus on happy things. Since we cannot change the past, and it is pointless to worry about the future, it is better not to dwell on them. Instead, we can think about happy things happening in the present.
Another useful approach is to forgive and forget. Blaming others for past hurts can spoil the present. Instead of dwelling on who has caused us pain, we need to forgive them, focus on present events and leave behind any blame or hurt we feel. Festering in the pain does not change the person who hurt us and it will cause us to stay in the past.
One of the most powerful tools for remaining focused on the positive and the present is meditation. Spending time in quiet reflection and silence, away from the hustle and bustle of daily life, enables us to come back to a centred place of being. With the pace of modern life growing ever faster, we are losing touch with our true inner peace and power. When we no longer feel grounded, we can experience ourselves pushed and pulled in different directions.
Meditation is a state of being in that place just beyond everyday consciousness, which is where spiritual empowerment begins. Spiritual awareness gives us the power to choose good and positive thoughts over those that are negative and wasteful. We start to recognise harmful patterns of thinking and behaviour and begin to avoid them, and develop the ability to steer our mind and focus it where we want. All of this gradually frees us from bondage to the past and fear of what lies ahead, enabling us to make the best use of the present to create a happy future.
B.K. Usha is a Rajyoga teacher at the Brahma Kumaris headquarters in Abu Road, Rajasthan.

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Spiritually Speaking

Spiritual mountaineering

Jane Kay

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Spiritual mountaineering

When we begin to answer the call for spiritual growth, we may search for a long time, looking for the path that resonates with us. Once we have found what we are looking for, the real journey begins.
It is like climbing a mountain. Not daunted in any way, but with delight, enthusiasm, excitement and courage. We often take along a lot more than we really need for the journey. Backpacks filled with attachments, old memories and ideas, and too much equipment that we think we might need. We start at the gentle slopes of the mountain, exhilarated, but carrying too much from the past. However, the spring in our step sends us onwards.
As we move slowly upwards, we appreciate how little we really need, and many of the items in the backpack are happily discarded and we begin to move more freely and with confidence. There is even time to look around and notice the other mountaineers. One mistake at this point is to start comparing our ascent with that of others. Spiritual mountaineers are not climbing the same mountain. Each one is climbing their own mountain. Each mountain is part of an immense and beautiful mountain range. Some mountains are higher than others, but to each mountaineer – the summit is the summit. The beauty of that is that climbers on other mountains can look over to us and wave encouragement, or signal something up ahead. This is because they have a different viewpoint, and if they have moved further upwards on their own mountain, they can see what lies ahead on ours. We can also do the same for others, but only I can climb my mountain.
Climbing mountains is not for the fainthearted. As we get higher, the atmosphere changes, weather conditions are often unstable, and sometimes there are storms that may turn out to be too strong for us. If that should happen, and we hurt ourselves, then we need to rest, find some kind of shelter to deal with any injuries, and regain our strength. We cannot fall off the mountain – it is ours, but we may delay the rise to the summit. However, once rested and with our goal in mind, we can set off again with even more zeal and enthusiasm, yet now with much more wisdom. The most important thing then is to never look back or look down. That part of the ascent is gone, so now, onwards and upwards!
We will know when we are getting close to the summit. The air is so pure and the breeze so refreshing. The storms are way below, and the view is spectacular. There is still need for wisdom and caution because we are not there yet, but only close to the top of the mountain will we find a deep sustaining silence and power, which brings lightness and a kind of bliss.
There is only one guide on this expedition. The ascent is spiritual, so the Guide must also be spiritual. The Guide is full of love and understanding and all I need to do is keep Him in mind at each step. He is always with me, but He has no need to climb. If I consult Him daily and listen to his advice and most importantly, follow it, I will reach the summit safely. I will need to spend time in silence and contemplation during each day’s climb to understand the advice and call upon Him at times of challenge. What a wonderful way to spend a lifetime; reaching the height of all I can be with the companionship of the One Divine Being. Once I reach those heights, I will feel like, and be, the king of my mountain.
Jane Kay is a university teaching fellow in the UK, and a Rajyoga teacher.

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Spiritually Speaking

Meditation is the most relevant time-management tool: Kamlesh

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Meditation is the most relevant time-management tool: Kamlesh

Kamlesh Patel, lovingly known as Daaji, is the fourth global teacher of ‘Heartfulness’, a simple set of heart-focused meditation practices to suit the busy lifestyle of today. Born in Gujarat, India, Kamlesh D. Patel showed an early interest in meditation and spiritual growth.
In an exclusive conversation with The Daily Guardian, Kamlesh explains why meditation is necessary for everyone leading a stressful life today and how to do it.
Q: What is Heartfulness Meditation and how did it originate? Is it affiliated with any religion or spiritual practice?
A: When we manage to tune into our feelings and capture the inspirations that come from our heart, making them the guiding source of our decisions, it is called “listening to the voice of the heart”. This kind of shifting from analytical thinking to deeper levels of feeling, intuition, and consciousness is possible through meditation on the heart, known as Heartfulness Meditation.
Q: How does one start Heartfulness Meditation?
A: One can begin meditation with a Heartfulness trainer one-on-one.
Q: With a basket of wellness programmes already available, why should one choose Heartfulness Meditation?
A: The process of Heartfulness Meditation has its foundation in the heart, where feelings and emotions reside. The unique aspect of Heartfulness is to meditate with the aid of yogic transmission, or Pranahuti, and such training is imparted by the Heartfulness Guide or trainers. Meditating on the heart improves emotional intelligence, sensitivity, and intuition.
Another distinguishing aspect of Heartfulness is the rejuvenation technique called cleaning, which removes emotional baggage of the past. Heartfulness Cleaning addresses emotions such as discontentment, restlessness, anxiety, anger, fear, confusion, and negativity, helping you feel light and rejuvenated.
Q: How long does one need to practice Heartfulness Meditation to feel the effect?
A: For some people, the first meditation session is a game changer; they feel the effect and are able to tell the difference immediately. But, of course, like any other practice, one has to try it regularly and sincerely for a period of 6 to 12 weeks to observe specific visible changes in their inner and outer environment. For example, only when you work out regularly for a couple of months in the gym can you see changes in your body. A mind or heart gym is no different.
Q: In today’s hectic lifestyle, how can we find the time to meditate?
A: Especially when we believe we don’t have time to meditate, we need to meditate more and more.
Meditation is the most important and relevant time-management tool in our lives. It helps us regulate our emotions. After all, what is time management if not emotional management? We need physical energy to do things, but, more importantly, we need mental and emotional resilience to manage multiple things in life. Meditating for an hour every morning helps us stay focused, align our priorities, and become emotionally resilient. That is the secret to time management. So, ‘hectic’ does not exist in our lifestyle; meditation does.
Q: Is there any fee or donation required to learn or practice Heartfulness?
A: All good things are available bountifully in nature and are free of cost. Do we pay for clean air, water, and love? Meditation is one of the noblest way to create peace. It is free of cost—a tradition that Heartfulness will always continue. Today, Heartfulness has spread to 160 countries.
Q: Does practicing Heartfulness require us to change our lifestyle? Is it compatible with normal family and work life?
A: Heartfulness changes our life for the better. We do not have to change anything. It helps us mold our lives to become the best version of ourselves that we can be. It helps us balance and regulate our lifestyle.
Q: Does Heartfulness work on medical ailments? If yes, which ones?
A: Recent research and work done by the Heartfulness Institute have proven that Heartfulness Meditation alleviates burnout and is extremely effective in increasing productivity, emotional wellness, and even telomere length, as published in a recent study.

Interviewed by Communication Professional Madhuri Shukla

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Spiritually Speaking

Our fears are our crutches

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Our fears are our crutches

Whenever great teachers have appeared in the world, they have been ridiculed, mocked, often punished, tortured, excommunicated, or even killed. They have shocked people, broken tradition and had their voices repeatedly silenced by rigid believers not ready to accept their words. It is ironic that since humans have learned to think, those in powerful positions have suppressed the voice of reason. Often, people are not ready to take the shock of being told that what they believe is not the truth. There is a beautiful story that illustrates this.
Hidden in the mountains, there was a strange village that had had no contact with the outside world for centuries. In the village, everybody used to walk with crutches. They all had beautiful crutches. They danced and farmed using their crutches. The carpenters there were the richest. They had made an industry of building crutches of all designs, shapes, and sizes. People even gave names to their crutches and worshipped those left behind by the departed ones. As soon as children turned one year old, they would be put on crutches and trained to walk with them.
One day, it so happened that a young man hobbled up to the village square in his crutches and proclaimed excitedly that crutches were not required, and that people could walk without them. He was instantly ridiculed and humiliated. He was scoffed at and laughed at. People started avoiding him and thought that he was a nutcase. They ordered him to get out of the village and not disturb their peaceful existence.
Desperate to prove his case, he asked for a week to prove his case and announced that the next Sunday he would walk without his crutches in the main village square. Everyone was curious and wanted to see this man do what he had preposterously claimed. So, the next Sunday, the whole village came out to the square to watch what would happen as they leaned on their trusty crutches.
The young man came and stood in the centre of the square. There was a pin-drop silence. A curious child craned her neck to watch as the young man nervously dropped one crutch-and a horrified whisper went around the whole square. And then, with great difficulty, the man raised his second crutch and stood swaying. The stunned crowd stood mesmerised, as time stopped for a moment, before they saw the man totter and fall.
The roar of scornful laughter was deafening. No one came up to help the youth, as the laughing and jeering crowd dispersed in a clatter of their ornate crutches. They said to each other, “See, we were right. We knew that he was a mad fellow. It is impossible to move without crutches.”
But, for a brief moment, the quiet girl frowned, and quickly, without being seen, lifted both crutches an inch off the ground.
Most people are walking around on invisible crutches.
Great teachers come to assure us that we can walk without crutches. Often, they too falter, but they remain unafraid. They may fall after they have dropped their crutches, but they persevere so that someday, someone, whose mind has been opened up, will try to walk without crutches.
All our fears are our crutches. How many crutches do we carry? Fear of being rejected, of being left alone, of being abandoned, of dying in pain.
It is we who have to get rid of our crutches. How will we get rid of them? By becoming aware of them.
As soon as we become aware of them, they will drop away. We are usually afraid of what we don’t know.
Often, we aren’t afraid of falling but of getting hurt when we hit the ground. To save ourselves from pain and distress, we take all kinds of safety precautions.
To prevent getting hurt, we want to avoid a fall, so we grab and hold on to crutches.
All that we believe in makes us who we are.

Captain Deepam Chatterjee (Retired) has recently written The Millennial Yogi published by Penguin Random House India.

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