Connect with us

Lifestyle & Entertainment

How concerts & live performances have changed in 2020

Noor Anand Chawla

Published

on

The arrival of October has always been the signal for festivities and outdoor recreations to begin. These range from puja pandals to music festivals, food fests to concerts, and live performances on stage. The sense of revelry in the air is palpable and calendars booked months in advance for pleasant fall and winter evenings! The pandemic may have dimmed our ardour for crowded outdoorsy events, but it has not taken away the need for social and cultural engagement.

 Artists, musicians and performers have taken to the digital medium to ride out these tough times. Performances, sharing recorded pieces and teaching classes on their craft, have kept them busy thus far. However, these virtual performances and recordings mostly cater to the existing fan base of the particular artists and are quite limited. Many of them face the problem of connecting with a new audience as they would have earlier, through organised events. This is where brands like ShowCase Studio are instrumental in bridging the gap between the artists and the audience.

 A branch of ShowCase Events, known for organising fabulous folk concerts, ShowCase Studio produces a weekly talk show, “In Conversation”, where a performer is invited to speak to an expert in their field while treating the audience to live performances. The show takes place every Sunday and tickets are sold on Townscript. It is an event unlike anything available in the overcrowded online space. Having thoroughly enjoyed the last few episodes, I was inspired to write this article.

 Concerts and live performances have changed immensely in 2020, but their virtual iterations have advantages too: 

A VIRTUAL LIVE SHOW HAS A UNIQUE CHARM 

A live performance given by an artist from their home or personal space, offers a sense of intimacy. It allows the viewer to feel privy to the lives of the artists — a far cry from the forced distance of raised concert stages. This sense of informality is further enhanced as the audience sees only themselves and their family members during the performance. It is a feeling of exclusivity, generally accorded to a privileged few. Digital media comes with its own peculiar challenges, but even these glitches somehow enhance the realness of the entire experience.

 A GLIMPSE INTO PERSONAL STORY OF ARTISTS

 Where most staged concerts and live performances are limited to the performance and perhaps a line or two of engaging banter with the audience, they never offer a look at the personal story of the performer. Virtual performances go a step beyond, as they allow the performer to speak about subjects they love above all else — their own craft. Most artists have in-depth knowledge of the history and evolution of their chosen forms of art, but keep that knowledge restricted to print and the odd TV interview, which have two drawbacks in comparison to the virtual live format. They do not allow the audience to participate in the questioning and discussion, and they are restricted to talking, with no scope for an amalgamation of the performance and the speech! 

CLASSIC ENTERTAINMENT FOR WHOLE FAMILY 

The pandemic has forced us to reassess our general spending habits, and it has also provided us with opportunities to be more frugal, as we venture out less. This is an added advantage, as entire families have the ability to view an episode or virtual concert on the price of a single ticket, as opposed to pre-pandemic days where they would necessarily buy tickets for each attendee. An unexpected yet welcome bonus! Though virtual concerts and live performances lack the largesse of in-person live concerts, they certainly have their own charm. Until things return to a semblance of normalcy, innovative performance-based talk shows like “In Conversation” hosted by ShowCase Studio are fulfilling the need for cultural entertainment. If you have been missing live concerts and performances, buy a ticket on Townscript for this Sunday’s episode where maverick vocalist and flautist Rasika Shekar performs and speaks to music journalist Narendra Kusnur. 

The writer is a lawyer who pens lifestyle articles on her successful blog www.nooranandchawla.com. She can be found on Instagram @nooranandchawla.

Lifestyle & Entertainment

EX-CONTESTANTS ON BIGG BOSS SURVIVAL KIT

Published

on

Have you ever wondered what it must be like, to be in the Bigg Boss house for weeks and months, far from your near ones — from all humanity, actually — and with cameras playing agents of voyeurism, dishing out your every move to the world outside?

 Most ‘Bigg Boss’ housemates would tell you the experience can leave you mentally drained, unless you develop a strong defence mechanism. The ones who have truly excelled talk of the need for a psychological survival kit, to tide over the tremendous pressure that the mind games inside the house bring in.

 ‘Bigg Boss 7’ winner Gauahar Khan counts the ability to retain one’s individuality as the biggest weapon.

“There is no fixed formula to win the show but I think it has a lot to do with one’s individuality. What you are and how well you connect to the audience matters the most. Everyone has a different personality. It’s just that one should know how to portray the traits in front of the audience,” Gauahar tells IANS.

 Actress Kamya Punjabi, who was one of the star attractions in the seventh season, recalls how she wanted to leave the show midway as it was becoming “unbearable” for her to live without her little daughter.

“It’s not at all easy to survive in the house. I remember there were days when I felt like leaving the show in between to go and meet my daughter. I was missing her so much,” says Kamya. For Kamya the tool of survival was the sheer realisation that getting to be on the show was a big deal. “It was a once-in-a lifetime opportunity. I knew I would never get this chance again. I knew I would meet my daughter after three months but I wouldn’t get such a golden chance again. That kept me going,” she recalls.

 A lot of playacting and drama may go on, but season 13 star Paras Chhabra insists it is important to stay real to make it to the finals. “People love a true personality. Stay as you are. If something wrong happens, stand for your beliefs,” he says.

Paras also emphasises on the necessity to be resiliently good with the tasks. “Tasks are very important in ‘Bigg Boss’. A contestant should be able to perform well in the tasks. It’s one of the surviving elements,” he adds. Paras was one of the top contestants in the 13th season. He left the finale race after opting for the cash prize of Rs 10 lakh.

 Mahira Sharma, who made headlines for her close bond with Paras in the house, has similar advice. “I feel it was my honesty and reality that worked. I don’t create relationships with others just for the sake of anything. If I am friends with someone, I try to give my 100 percent to that bond. I think that’s what people loved about me when I was in the house,” she says.

 Survival, of course, can mean different things to different people, and it shows in the way contestants approach the game.

For season 13 housemate Aarti Singh, the essential item in her survival kit was a strong urge to prove herself. It is something that helped her reach the finale race despite panic attacks, she says. “I knew this was my last chance to prove myself. I would be lying if I say it was easy to live in the house. I had panic attacks while I was living in the house and it was all on national TV. I showed every side of mine because I knew it was a do or die situation. Whether I was real or confident or lallu or oversmart — whatever I was, I was just real. People appreciate truth and honesty,” shares Aarti.

 Do the trademark abuses and fights of the show really help contestants to gain mileage and survive till the end? Actress Devoleena Bhattacharjee, who participated in season 13, disagrees.

“Abusive behaviour may help you survive but it can create a lot of negative impact, too. I remember Salman sir used to warn us and always remind us that there’s life outside the show and we should present ourselves in a dignified manner,” she notes.

 Paras says unnecessary fights, howsoever they may let you grab eyeballs, is the last thing you would want in your survival kit inside the house. “If there are valid fights, it’s okay. But that does not mean you keep on fighting. There have been instances when contestants got evicted owing to their fights,” he points out.

Continue Reading

Lifestyle & Entertainment

Natalie is training for new Thor film

Published

on

Actress Natalie Portman says she finds training for the upcoming superhero film, ‘Thor: Love and Thunder’, hard. The actress opened up about preparing for the film in Sydney when she joined ‘The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon’ virtually, reports eonline.com. Fallon pointed out that a lot of training and exercise goes into superhero films, and Portman confessed she was dreading it. “I’m trying. I’ve also had months of pandemic, eating baked goods and lying in bed and feeling sorry for myself. So I’m super tired during and after working out and dreading before,” she said. The Oscar winning actress is all set to return to the Marvel Cinematic Universe with ‘Thor: Love and Thunder’. She will be the first female to play the superhero Thor.

Continue Reading

Lifestyle & Entertainment

Matthew was sexually abused as a teen

Published

on

Matthew McConaughey has revealed that he has been a victim of sexual abuse several times during his teenage years. In his new memoir, ‘Greenlights’, McConaughey opened up about being sexually abused, reports variety.com.

 In the beginning of the book, McConaughey shares several facts about himself, which include his personal experience with sexual abuse. He revealed that his first time having sex was not consensual and that he was “blackmailed” into it. “I was blackmailed into having sex for the first time when I was 15. I was certain I was going to hell for the premarital sex. Today, I am merely certain that I hope that’s not the case,” he writes in his memoir.

 McConaughey also revealed that he was “molested by a man when (he) was 18 while knocked unconscious in the back of a van.” He didn’t include many more details about his experience, but McConaughey shared that he does not consider himself a victim of the situations.

 “I’ve never felt like a victim. I have a lot of proof that the world is conspiring to make me happy,” he said. The actor also opened up about his parents’ tumultuous relationship, his marriage to Camila Alves and his philosophy in ‘Greenlights’.

Continue Reading

Lifestyle & Entertainment

First look: Prabhas as Vikramaditya in ‘Radhe Shyam’

Published

on

Prabhas is all set to ring in his birthday today and to bring in more cheers to his fans with an advanced birthday wish, makers of ‘Radhe Shyam’ released the character poster of Prabhas recently. The star will be portraying the character of Vikramaditya and from the looks of it, the anticipation around his look seems right. Taking to their social media, the makers shared Prabhas’ look and poster, “The Big moment has arrived! Here’s introducing #Prabhas as #Vikramaditya from #RadheShyam! #RadheShyamSurprise #HappyBirthdayPrabhas Starring #Prabhas & @hegdepooja.”

Earlier also, to mark Pooja Hegde’s birthday, the makers had revealed her first look from the movie on her birthday. The team is currently shooting in Torino, Italy. Touted to be a magnum opus, ‘Radhe Shyam’ is suggested to be an epic love story set in Europe. The film also features Sachin Khedekar, Bhagyashree, Priyadarshi, Murali Sharma, Sasha Chettri, and Kunaal Roy Kapur among others. Directed by Radha Krishna Kumar, the multilingual period drama is expected to release in 2021

Continue Reading

Lifestyle & Entertainment

A glimpse into Shahid’s early morning cricket practice

Published

on

 Shahid Kapoor has shared a sneak-peek from his early morning cricket practice for the upcoming film ‘Jersey’. Shahid is seen hitting a straight drive in a video he posted on Instagram . He is dressed for practice in a black T-shirt, basketball shorts, leg guards, gloves and a helmet. “Early mornings.. wake up with drive,” he wrote alongside the video. The actor and his co-actor Mrunal Thakur recently completed the Uttarakhand schedule of the film. ‘Jersey’ is a Hindi remake of the Telugu hit of the same name. The Hindi version is also being directed by Gowtam Tinnanuri, who helmed the 2019 original. The story is about a talented but failed cricketer named Arjun, who decides to make a comeback in his late thirties and play for India, in order to fulfil his son’s wish.

Continue Reading

Lifestyle & Entertainment

ANIL KAPOOR REVEALS HIS WEAKNESS

Published

on

Anil Kapoor confessed on social media recently that his weak point is food. The actor also shared how he has adopted a new approach to eating to achieve a sharper look since lockdown.

Anil Kapoor wrote on his verified Instagram account: “Everyone has a weak point. Mine is food. The Punjabi boy in me needs the taste buds ignited, my eyes always bigger than my belly. During lockdown, I have set myself the task of achieving a new sharper look. This new look needs a new approach to eating. Both Harsh and my trainer Marc have taken it upon themselves to remind me constantly and lay down eating plans. I try and I battle. Sometimes I even fall. And what I’ve learnt through it all is that a chain is only as strong as it’s weakest link. So everyone in the house had to get involved. ”

 Anil added, “From those who kindly cook my food to the support of my family gathered round me at meal time. Fitness is never a one man/ women crusade, it’s about support and encouragement when we need it the most. (Always get family involved and on board to help you in any diet if you wish to make it truely a success).”

 “Is it easy? Not always, if I am honest. Some days the Punjabi boy sulks a little, but then some days, like this day with this picture… it makes it all worth it,” he concluded.

Continue Reading

Trending