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Transforming the narrative around education in Kota

In 2007, Aamir Khan’s cinematic masterpiece, “Taare Zameen Par,” left an indelible mark on audiences. While the film may not have appealed to the younger generation enamored with romantic or action-packed tales, its timeless message remains relevant today. They may be interested in films like Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge and Sholay. Well, I am talking […]

In 2007, Aamir Khan’s cinematic masterpiece, “Taare Zameen Par,” left an indelible mark on audiences. While the film may not have appealed to the younger generation enamored with romantic or action-packed tales, its timeless message remains relevant today. They may be interested in films like Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge and Sholay. Well, I am talking about the film Taare Zameen because it is needed even in today’s times, but in a different way.

The storyline revolves around a child disinterested in conventional studies, grappling with dyslexia, yet showcasing exceptional artistic talent. Khan’s portrayal of a teacher advocating for nurturing individual interests echoes a powerful call to rethink conventional education norms. This echoes a sentiment mirrored in his film “Three Idiots,” urging parents to embrace their child’s passions rather than imposing predetermined career paths.
The parents are hell-bent on making their children doctors and engineers. As a result, it seems that the beautiful city of Kota is getting a bad name.

Kota is the biggest coaching hub of the country. A large number of children from every corner of the country come there to take coaching. More than 200 small and big renowned coaching centers are running there. According to an estimate, the annual turnover of the coaching centers of Kota is more than Rs. 9 thousand crores. The government gets more than Rs. 700 crores as tax. For some time now, Kota has developed into a beautiful city.

Despite Kota’s burgeoning appeal as a tourist destination and the Chambal River Front gaining acclaim, the city grapples with the disconcerting stigma of student suicides. The root cause lies in the relentless pressure imposed on students, particularly those pursuing medical and engineering coaching. Nowadays, there is only one fear that some such news may come again that some innocent child has committed suicide. Foreign tourists are also coming here in large numbers. It has started coming.

The government is getting huge revenue from tourism. But the sad thing is that instead of its beauty, Kota is facing the stigma of suicides. The people of Kota are sad that children are committing suicide in large numbers. Most of the children come to Kota for medical and engineering coaching. What began as a promising coaching hub in 1999 has transformed Kota into an educational epicenter, but recent suicide statistics tarnish its image nationwide. Coaching centers started opening here in 1999 and by the year 2000, it became a big hub of coaching.

In two decades, its network spread in Kota and its surrounding areas. But everything went well for the first ten to fifteen years. The first incident came to light in 2012. After that the situation remained under control. But the figures of the last one and a half to two years are worrying. The government coaching centers are trying to stop these incidents. But this is not happening. The image of Kota city has been affected in the entire country.

In fact, when children come here to take coaching, the first pressure on them is to pass. Parents also put pressure on them and say that everything depends on you, son. Some parents take a loan and hope to make their child a doctor or engineer. Most of the families belong to the middle class. This means that from the very first day the child Comes under pressure. After this, such a competition starts in which the child is put through tests almost every day. Weekly test is the first challenge. The pressure of studies increases so much that the child comes under immense pressure. And it seems that some children are under pressure. Are broken by.

Now at such a time, it is important to mention movies like Taare Zameen Par and 3 Idiots. All parents who want their children to be a doctor or an engineer should watch these two films. This will help them to know their child’s interests from the very first day. After this, when they send their child for coaching, perhaps there will be less pressure. Don’t make it. The good thing would be that the child will also study without pressure and pass the actual examination.

One suggestion is that the coaching staff of Kota should also show such informative films to the children so that the pressure on them is reduced. This should not happen. There should not be competition regarding weekly exams etc. Children should be told that even if a doctor does not become an engineer, there are other ways. Recently, the 12th fail picture also has a good message. There is a good dialogue in it. At the time of IPS interview, the question is asked that what will you do if you do not become an IPS.

The answer was very good. I will go back to the village, become a teacher and teach the children that passing has to be done by hard work and not by copying. Hard work is important, not pressure. Children and parents have to understand this. In conclusion, the transformation of Kota’s educational landscape necessitates a collective effort. Parents, educators, and coaching centers must work collaboratively to instill a love for learning, replacing pressure with joy.

It is time to discard the narrative of competition and embrace a holistic approach that prioritizes a child’s well-being over relentless academic pursuits. Only through such a paradigm shift can Kota shed the unwarranted stigma and emerge as an educational haven that nurtures talents and passions, ensuring the holistic development of its students.

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