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Mount Fuji Implements Entry Fee For Hikers Amid New Crowd Control Measures

Japan’s Mount Fuji kicked off its summer climbing season on Monday with stringent crowd management strategies aimed at curbing over-tourism on the popular Yoshida Trail. Climbers now face a 2,000 yen ($13) entry fee, with a cap of 4,000 visitors daily and the option for online reservations, prioritizing safety and environmental preservation. “I really like […]

Japan’s Mount Fuji kicked off its summer climbing season on Monday with stringent crowd management strategies aimed at curbing over-tourism on the popular Yoshida Trail. Climbers now face a 2,000 yen ($13) entry fee, with a cap of 4,000 visitors daily and the option for online reservations, prioritizing safety and environmental preservation.

“I really like the idea because if you respect the mountain, you have to limit the people,” expressed hiker Chetna Joshi at the trail’s bustling Fifth Station, likening recent Fuji crowds to Everest’s peak traffic.

Despite weather hindrances, including wind and drizzle preventing summit ascents, Joshi found the experience valuable: “I love mountains. I think it is not giving me permission this time, that’s OK. I accept it.”

Mount Fuji, drawing over 220,000 climbers annually from July to September, symbolizes Japan’s allure post-pandemic, reflecting record tourism surges. Yet, challenges persist, with concerns over inadequate preparation among climbers and recent incidents underscoring safety imperatives.

Governor Kotaro Nagasaki emphasized the measures’ vital role in safeguarding lives, following recent reports of fatalities near the summit. As tourism soars, balancing access with conservation remains pivotal, echoing global destinations grappling with sustainability amidst rising visitor numbers.

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Crowd Control MeasuresMount FujiTDGThe Daily Guardian