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Hurricane Beryl Sparks Concerns Across Caribbean And Mexico Resulting In 11 deaths

Hurricane Beryl, the first major storm of the 2024 Atlantic hurricane season, has caused extensive damage across the Caribbean and Mexico. It became a Category 5 hurricane unusually early in the season, partly due to human-caused climate change. The storm first struck several Caribbean countries, including Jamaica, Grenada, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, and northern […]

Hurricane Beryl, the first major storm of the 2024 Atlantic hurricane season, has caused extensive damage across the Caribbean and Mexico. It became a Category 5 hurricane unusually early in the season, partly due to human-caused climate change.

The storm first struck several Caribbean countries, including Jamaica, Grenada, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, and northern Venezuela, resulting in at least 11 deaths. As it moved northwest, Beryl hit Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula as a Category 2 hurricane. This led to widespread power failures and a red alert from Mexico’s civil protection agency, urging residents to stay indoors or find safe shelter.

Beryl’s impact highlighted the vulnerability of regions to early and powerful hurricanes, exacerbated by warmer ocean temperatures linked to climate change. Ongoing monitoring and preparedness efforts were crucial as the storm continued towards the Gulf of Mexico, where it posed further risks of flooding and other hazards.

Even as Hurricane Beryl weakened to 160 km/h (100 mph) winds when it hit near Tulum, Mexico, its danger persisted as it headed towards the Gulf of Mexico. Experts warned about possible floods and landslides, fearing warm Gulf waters could strengthen it again. Mexican leaders, like President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, urged people to prepare and sent help to places like Cancun, where travel and services were heavily disrupted.

In the Caribbean, Hurricane Beryl left 60% of Jamaica without power and caused several casualties. The storm’s early formation and strength highlighted concerns from climate experts about more severe hurricane seasons due to global warming. The warmer waters in the North Atlantic, as noted by NOAA, were ideal for Beryl to grow quickly and stay strong.

As Hurricane Beryl moved across Mexico towards the Gulf, it emphasized the importance of constant monitoring and readiness. The storm’s behavior showed how early hurricanes can be unpredictable, highlighting the urgent need for communities to strengthen their ability to withstand such severe weather worsened by climate change.

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11 deathsHurricane BerylMexicoTDGThe Daily Guardian