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How quiet quitting impacts businesses globally

The events of the past two years have exacerbated some longstanding corporate challenges, such as a healthy work-life equation and putting the needs of the self before the employer. This has led to seismic shifts in employee behaviour, causing the Great Resignation. A PwC survey explained that one in five employees planned to switch jobs […]

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The events of the past two years have exacerbated some longstanding corporate challenges, such as a healthy work-life equation and putting the needs of the self before the employer. This has led to seismic shifts in employee behaviour, causing the Great Resignation.

A PwC survey explained that one in five employees planned to switch jobs in 2022.

But, apart from the Great Resignation, companies across the globe are now dealing with quiet quitting from employees. For workers, quiet quitting is a rejection of the hustle culture and a way to achieve the perfect work-life balance.

 What is ‘quiet quitting’?

 The central idea of quiet quitting is doing the minimum necessary work per the job role. For quiet quitters, work is not the primary focus of life, and they resist putting in extra hours. They also have a disinclination towards going beyond what their position requires, taking on tasks that are strictly within their job description.

Quiet quitting employees want to set clear boundaries to improve work-life balance. Such employees fulfil their job roles but do not subscribe to the work-is-life ideology to guide their careers and stand out among their peers.

It can take different forms depending on the employee and their reasons not to actively participate on the work front. Some signs that are commonly associated with quiet quitting are:

– Arriving late or leaving early

– Lack of contribution to team projects

– Absence of passion and enthusiasm regarding work

– Lack of participation in meetings

– Considerable reduction in the quality or quantity of work being done

Reasons behind quiet quitting

Some of the common reasons for quiet quitting are:

– To avoid burnout: For many employees, job-related burnout has become a common problem, especially for those working remotely. For instance, remote workers are logging in more hours than previously, as per the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). In such cases, quiet quitting becomes a route to avoid burnout, and these employees decide that they are not going to overwork themselves anymore.

– As a self-care tactic: For some employees, quitting is more about mental well-being and self-care than feeling unappreciated. Many employees are plagued by anxious thoughts regarding the work assigned, even when not working on it. These employees put other things before work-related tasks without feeling guilty.

– Lack of motivation: According to a survey by Pew Research, around 47% of workers in the US believe that their job is just a way to pay bills. For such employees, there is a lack of purpose or motivation at work that aligns with their life goals. This leads to decreased job engagement and a lack of productivity.

– Lack of growth opportunities: According to a McKinsey report, one of the top reasons employees look for a change is the lack of career advancement opportunities. Similarly, a lack of opportunity can turn a diligent worker into a quiet quitter. If employees don’t find room for professional or personal growth, they will feel demotivated and refuse to pick up work beyond their roles.

How can organisations avoid quiet quitting

-Ensure the team is adequately compensated

Any change in job responsibilities should be discussed with the employee, along with a salary hike, depending on the new role and responsibilities. Proper compensation ensures that trust between the employer and employees is maintained, and employees don’t feel devalued.

-Clearly describe the roles and responsibilities

A common complaint among workers is how they end up handling more tasks than they were hired to do. Therefore, it is best to be clear about role growth in the interview stage. Discuss the role with the candidate clearly and help them see it increase in scope, which will accommodate different roles and responsibilities in the future.

-Reward employee achievements  

According to a Deloitte study, employees need to feel appreciated and valued in the workplace. It is one of the primary engagement drivers for them. By acknowledging and rewarding the hard work put in by your staff, you are telling them that they are valued. You also show that going above and beyond what is expected benefits them.

-Maintain work-life balance

Burnout due to work is among the primary reasons people start quietly quitting. Thus, it is beneficial to implement a few policies, such as making after-hours calls and emails optional, offering time off, and encouraging employees to use them.

-Create rapport between employees and management

Creating a rapport between the workers and their managers helps build a feedback loop. Bosses who are more than just authority figures inspire a stronger sense of commitment among their workers. These workers are more likely to tell their bosses about issues plaguing them at their job, enabling managers to resolve any that lead to quiet quitting.

Conclusion

Quiet quitting can be easily countered by engaging employees and making them feel worthy. Creating a workspace that fosters collaboration and learning can make employees feel appreciated and inspire them to give their best.

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