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How doctors are dealing with virus

As doctors continue to fight against the pandemic as frontline warriors, The Daily Guardian talks to some of them to know how they are maintaining a healthy work-life balance.

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Healthcare professionals are worrying about their families’ health besides their own — like the rest of us. They are wondering whether it’s safe to come home after disinfecting themselves or they should live in a separate floor or place. Some of them are only seeing their family through the window or video calling them, while others thoroughly scrub themselves in the shower before greeting their loved ones. Be it taking the right precautions at the workplace or maintaining a bit of judicious social distancing at home, these doctors are doing everything possible to keep their loved ones safe. All this while, giving utmost importance to treating patients and serving the nation in testing times.

Keeping myself busy with family: Dr Ishwar Gilada

The entire globe is affected by the pandemic. My family and I are neither alone nor immune to it. Once this understanding goes down well then keeping up is not difficult. I am busier than preCovid-19 times. My routine clinical work is on and I am additionally involved with the prevention, control and mitigation of Covid-19. With the daily analysis of global, national, state and local scenarios, sharing the same on social media and with mass media, webinars, meetings and discussion groups at the national and global level, I don’t know how these five months have passed. I never stopped or altered the daily routine, exercises or my duties. I virtually meet my extended family and friends. For almost four months we were together in lockdown, barring our professional duties. From having meals to fun-frolic and discussions on Covid-19 all around, we shared collective wisdom.

Dr Gilada is an infectious diseases expert and secretary general of Organised Medicine Academic Guild.

No better stress buster than to see people recover: Dr Nitin Bansal

Initially, the strange scenario felt like a burden. Learning to wear PPE was not an easy task and there was a lurking fear whether the PPE was working or not. There was still not much clarity on issues like how closely a patient can be examined or how much can one consult a patient. Now five months into the pandemic, I can wear a PPE within five minutes which used to take me 15-20 minutes before. We are at peace since many patients are recovering in front of our eyes. There is no better stress buster than to see their health improving. Support from my family and the hospital has helped me maintain a sound balance. The fact that you are not alone and have a supporting infrastructure helps you overcome the challenges.

Dr Bansal is a consultant, infectious diseases at Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute & Research Centre, Delhi.

Highly fulfilling to serve the nation at this time: Dr Shuchin Bajaj

 Life has become an emergency drill. Being a doctor at a full-fledged Covid-19 hospital, my life revolves around emergencies. Though it’s highly fulfilling to serve your nation at this time of need, at times we also crave for a normal life. I go to the hospital and treat patients, then come home and scrub myself while taking a shower. The intensity is probably harder than ever. I diligently do it thrice a day to avoid putting my family’s life at stake. Like other parents, I worry for my children but try to hold my feelings and emotions inside. As doctors, we have been trained well to do that. I hope the pandemic will end soon.

Dr Bajaj is a consultant, internal medicine at Ujala Cygnus Orthocare Hospital, Delhi.

I believe in existing for a purpose: Dr Jayakanth MJ

I believe that everything has a purpose and my existence is to serve the current purpose that the world is struggling with. I exercise for a longer duration and consume more fruits and vegetables to feel light and energetic throughout the day. I used to be stressed about the pandemic earlier. But with the government’s awareness campaigns about Covid-19, I started seeing the change in terms of maintaining social distancing and following strict lockdown norms. It made me realise that we can conquer this disease. I plan my schedule a day prior, set goals and prioritise them. I take short breaks between work and energise myself by listening to music. I enjoy my weekend bike rides and recharge myself.

 Dr Jayakanth is a consultant, internal medicine at Columbia Asia Hospital Sarjapur Road, Bengaluru.

Can’t allow fears to overpower our will: Dr Vijay Dutta

Duty at the hospital has become more challenging than pre-pandemic times as there are strict protocols to adhere to for our safety. This was never the case before as we used to always be concerned for patients’ safety. Wearing PPEs for long hours means no food or water or even restroom breaks but it’s necessary. The fear of contracting the infection exists but we cannot allow our fears to overpower our will. We are certainly worried about our families, especially those with elderly parents or toddlers at home. But understanding what our nature of work entails we support each other. Being around them does bring a sense of normalcy in our lives.

Dr Dutta is a consultant, internal medicine at Indian Spinal Injuries Centre, Delhi.

Discipline is the key: Dr Amita Phadnis

Covid-19 has forced us to reorganise our lives, a proper structure and discipline are key, which we had to re-ensure in our lives. During this time, we found that meditation has been largely beneficial as it keeps us fit and maintains our mental resilience. I am mainly working from home as online consultations are the new thing. Making conscious efforts towards staying positive is helping me to strike a balance. In the evenings, I make virtual social engagements such as calling friends, organising online games or reviving lost connections.

Dr Phadnis is CMD and paediatrician & neonatologist at ONP Hospitals, Pune.

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Health & Wellness

India’s daily Covid cases are at a four-month low ahead of the festive season

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India’s Covid-19 infection tally fell below 2,000 for the first time in four months on Tuesday, with the country recording 1,968 new infections in the previous 24 hours. Over 26,300 new infections were reported in India in the week ending October 2.

After two years of muted celebrations due to the virus, the latest dip is being viewed as a respite by thousands across the country.

Here are some of the most recent updates on the country’s pandemic situation:

  • The daily Covid tally on Tuesday was the lowest in 133 days. On May 23, a total of 1,675 cases were reported in a 24-hour period.
  • According to data from the Union Health Ministry, the number of active cases has also decreased by 1,528 in the last 24 hours, to 34,598. Active cases currently account for 0.08 percent of all cases.
  • According to the reports, the daily positivity rate was 0.94 percent, while the weekly positivity rate was 1.29 percent.
  • The nationwide Covid-19 death toll has risen to 5,28,716 with 15 fatalities, including eight deaths reconciled by Kerala, according to data updated by the ministry.
  • According to state data, the national capital reported 39 Covid-19 cases in the last 24 hours. Maharashtra reported 186 new infections, with Mumbai accounting for 66 of them.
  •  On Tuesday, Madhya Pradesh reported 13 new cases, J&K reported 11 cases, and Gujarat reported 62 infections.
  • The southern state of Tamil Nadu saw 461 new infections, which was slightly higher than the state average. Telangana had 73 cases reported.

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Health & Wellness

Vietnam reports its first case of monkeypox

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Monkeypox

Health officials in Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh City announced the country’s first case of monkeypox on Monday, according to the state-run Vietnamnet newspaper, without providing any details on the patient.

According to the reports, Mainland China reported its first case of monkeypox last month in the western megacity of Chongqing in a traveller who arrived from abroad.

The traveller arrived in China on an unspecified date, according to the Wall Street Journal, citing the Chongqing health commission. The traveller developed a rash and other symptoms while being quarantined in accordance with COVID-19 controls, a practice that affects anyone arriving from abroad, according to the WSJ.

After reviewing test results, the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed the monkeypox case. According to the report, the traveller is being treated at a designated hospital and is in good condition.

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Health & Wellness

What is The Full Meaning of Health?

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Health is a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. Health may refer to the ability to adapt and manage physical, mental, spiritual, emotional, and social conditions through changes in lifestyle or self-care.

The word “health” is sometimes used as an abbreviation for “health care”, although health care is only one part of what is meant by health. For example, one might speak about the benefits of “going to the doctor” or “taking medicine”, or the costs of not getting enough sleep or exercise.

There are many other factors that impact on health each day:  nutrition(the food we eat), childhood experiences (the way we were raised), quality of medical care (the drugs and surgery used), genetics (how strong our immune system is), stress levels (whether we feel anxious or depressed), environmental exposure to chemicals and toxins (pesticides on crops, exhaust from cars) and so on .

Health is a state of optimal physical, mental and social well-being, not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. An important way to promote health is to prevent disease, which can be accomplished through immunization programs and screening for early signs of disease. Promotion of good health often involves advice and education about healthy eating habits, exercise, hygiene, self-care, preventive measures against infectious diseases and other health practices. Health care systems are organizations established to meet the health needs of target populations.

Why do we need a healthy lifestyle?

A healthy lifestyle refers to the habits that help people live longer and healthier lives. A healthy lifestyle includes:

Eating a balanced diet that includes fruits and vegetables.

Regular exercise.

Not smoking cigarettes.

https://dolpxy.com/

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Health & Wellness

Kashmiri ASHA worker serves as inspiration by donating blood 28 times

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A 32-year-old woman named Bilqees Ara, an ASHA worker, has donated blood 28 times since 2012. She has served as an inspiration to others across the nation.

Bilqees, who is from the Handwara Tehsil in the Kupwara area of North Kashmir, stated that she understands the “importance of blood”.

She said that by donating a pint of blood, she not only saves a precious life but an entire family.

She began donating blood in 2012 and has since given 28 pints.

She expressed her gratitude and pride at being the saviour of so many patients in the Kashmir valley.

I’ve seen people cry helplessly as they try to get blood to save their loved ones, but I’m proud of myself because I’ve arranged blood for them as well. “I felt an inner joy after that,” she said.

In Kashmir, she is known as the “Blood Woman of Kashmir”.

She is a registered blood donor. Whenever a need arises, the officials at the Blood Bank at Handwara hospital call her and, within the shortest span of time, she makes herself available to donate blood.

Women should come forward and do this as there is nothing to be afraid of. This is to be done for society, she said. She also said that she wondered who else would do it if she refused.

If a person has blood and courage, why can’t he give it to someone else in a time of need? She asked.

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Health & Wellness

Covid facilities to reduce in Delhi amid drop in cases

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The Delhi government has closed 11 Covid care facilities because to a consistent reduction in cases. Two Covid Care Centers are operational at Ambedkar Nagar Hospital, which has 50 beds, and Balak Ram Hospital, which has 25 beds, according to a government report. Only five admissions were registered at Ambedkar Nagar Hospital over the past three months, while there were none at Balak Ram Hospital.

The number of patients has steadily decreased at the remaining CCCs as well, according to reports.

According to officials, the Delhi Disaster Management Authority on Thursday decided to scale back the medical staff and infrastructure that had been deployed for COVID management in a planned manner. The health department will now formulate an action plan in response to this decision.

“The deven CCCs were closed and dismantled by Delhi government and one by the Centre and three others with total 4000 bed capacity- Radha Saomi Satsang ,Chattarpur, Sawan Kirpal, Burari , and Sant Nirankari, Burari- were closed but not yet dismantled”, officials said.

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Health & Wellness

India’s daily covid tally falls below 5k with 4,858 new cases

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India reported 4,858 new Covid-19 cases in the last 24 hours, 806 fewer than yesterday, bringing the total to 4,45,39,046, according to data released by the Union health ministry on Monday. On the other hand, according to the health bulletin, the number of active cases rose to 48,027.

India has 0.11 percent of the infections that are still active, and the Covid recovery rate has risen to 98.71 percent. 2.76 percent was the daily positivity rate, while 1.78 percent was the weekly positivity rate.

Infections with the coronavirus are currently most common in Kerala, followed by Tamil Nadu, Maharashtra, Karnataka, Assam, and West Bengal.

The health ministry stated that as many as 18 fatalities were reported today, taking the death toll to 5,28,355. This included eight deaths reconciled by Kerala.

According to the data available, 2.16 billion doses of vaccines have been administered in the country so far under the nationwide Covid vaccination drive.

On December 19, India’s Covid-19 total had reached one billion. On May 4 and June 23, respectively, last year, it reached the depressing milestones of two and three crore. On January 25 of this year, the number of Covid cases in the nation surpassed four crore.

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