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Baltimore Bridge Crash: 8 Indian Crew Members Finally Head Home After 3 Months

Eight crew members of the ship involved in the Francis Scott Key Bridge incident in Baltimore have finally returned home after being stranded on the vessel for three months. The ship, named Dali, departed Baltimore’s port on Monday with only four of the original 21 crew members still on board. Assisted by four tugboats, the […]

Baltimore Bridge Crash: 8 Indian Crew Members Finally Head Home After 3 Months
Baltimore Bridge Crash: 8 Indian Crew Members Finally Head Home After 3 Months

Eight crew members of the ship involved in the Francis Scott Key Bridge incident in Baltimore have finally returned home after being stranded on the vessel for three months. The ship, named Dali, departed Baltimore’s port on Monday with only four of the original 21 crew members still on board. Assisted by four tugboats, the 948ft (289m) Dali made its way to Norfolk, Virginia, in a journey expected to last between 16 to 20 hours.

The incident occurred on March 26, resulting in the tragic deaths of six repair workers on the bridge. Approximately 50,000 tonnes of debris had to be cleared, and the Dali was relocated to port before the shipping channel at the Port of Baltimore could fully reopen in June.

The majority of the crew, all except one of whom are Indian nationals, were unable to leave the ship as it remained in the channel. They were considered witnesses and lacked valid visas or shore passes to enter the United States.

Darrel Wilson, spokesperson for Synergy Marine, the ship’s management company, confirmed that eight crew members have now returned home, with two more expected to depart the US soon. He noted that four original crew members remained onboard to assist with moving the vessel to Norfolk before returning to Baltimore.

Recently, Synergy Marine announced that the remaining crew members would stay behind to aid with the investigation. Baltimore withdrew a petition that initially sought to prevent any crew members from leaving until they were questioned. A resolution involving the city, the ship’s owner, and its management company allowed some crew members to depart, although they are still obligated to be available for depositions even after leaving the US.

The crew had been interviewed by the Department of Justice, and subsequently, investigators determined there was no reason to keep them in the United States. The National Transportation Safety Board disclosed that the Dali experienced multiple power failures leading up to the collision with the bridge. The crash is currently under investigation by the US Coast Guard and the FBI.

Authorities anticipate the Francis Scott Key Bridge will be reconstructed by 2028, with an estimated cost of approximately $1.9 billion (£1.5 billion). Baltimore has resisted efforts by the Dali’s owner to limit liability to $43 million (£33.9 million).

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Baltimore Bridge CrashCrewDaliTDGThe Daily Guardian