+

Amarnath Cave's Shivling Melting At Alarming Rate Amidst Heatwave

The Shivling shrine at Amarnath cave in the Himalayas is melting due to a severe heatwave, just over a week into this year’s pilgrimage that started on June 29. More than 150,000 devotees have already visited the site. The cave, located at 3,880 meters altitude in Jammu and Kashmir, is deeply important to millions of […]

Amarnath Cave's Shiv Ling Threatened by Heatwave: Sacred Ice Melts
Amarnath Cave's Shiv Ling Threatened by Heatwave: Sacred Ice Melts

The Shivling shrine at Amarnath cave in the Himalayas is melting due to a severe heatwave, just over a week into this year’s pilgrimage that started on June 29. More than 150,000 devotees have already visited the site.

The cave, located at 3,880 meters altitude in Jammu and Kashmir, is deeply important to millions of Hindus worldwide as Lord Shiva’s divine home. The melting of the Shivling inside the cave is caused by the ongoing heatwave affecting the region.

Since May, northern and central India has been facing severe heatwaves, including the Amarnath valley, where temperatures have been rising sharply in recent weeks. Despite these tough conditions, pilgrims continue to come to Jammu and Kashmir to pay homage to Baba Barfani, as the shrine is lovingly called.

Formation of the Shivling

The Shivling in Amarnath Cave is a natural ice stalagmite formed inside. In summer, water from the cave roof freezes, making the iconic Shivling. This process symbolizes Lord Shiva and is very important spiritually. People have been fascinated by it for centuries.

Temporary Suspension

The Amarnath Yatra started on June 29 using two routes: Nunwan-Pahalgam and Baltal. But on July 7, heavy rainfall forced authorities to stop the pilgrimage temporarily. Rainfall on both routes led to this decision for safety.

Last year, over 450,000 pilgrims visited the Amarnath Cave. The yatra ends on August 19, and organizers and pilgrims hope the weather will stay good so the pilgrimage can finish without problems.

This shows how nature and people’s actions affect important spiritual places. As the climate changes, it’s more important than ever to protect these sacred sites.

Tags:

Amarnath Cave ShrineJammu and KashmirTDGThe Daily Guardian