Akshay Kumar’s ‘Bell Bottom’ all set to go international - The Daily Guardian
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Akshay Kumar’s ‘Bell Bottom’ all set to go international

Priyanka Sharma

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Akshay Kumar is called the “Khiladi of Bollywood” and he leaves no stone unturned to prove it time and again. As the film industry gears up to recover from Covid-induced lockdown and losses incurred due to a stall on shooting and production work, Akshay Kumar on Monday announced that his upcoming film Bell Bottom would go on floors next month in the UK. With this, the film will become the first-ever Hindi film to commence shooting on an international location after lockdown.

After introducing Vaani Kapoor as the leading lady, the actor revealed that Lara Dutta and Huma Qureshi would be joining the star cast. Sharing it on Instagram, Akshay wrote, “Looking forward to doing what we do best! Time we get back to work! ‘Bell Bottom’ to go on floors next month.” Vaani Kapoor shared, “Gearing up for better times ahead.

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Here’s how eating habits could cause child obesity

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Washington [US], January 23 (ANI): A study led by researchers of Baylor University revealed that the variety in the utilization of market-gained nourishments outside of a traditional diet routine can prove to be a reason for obesity in children, whether they do physical activities or not.
“The importance of a poor diet versus low energy expenditure on the development of childhood obesity remains unclear,” said Samuel Urlacher, PhD, assistant professor of anthropology at Baylor University, CIFAR Azrieli Global Scholar, and lead author of the study.
“Using gold-standard measures of energy expenditure, we show that relatively lean, rural forager-horticulturalist children in the Amazon spend approximately the same total number of calories each day as their much fatter peri-urban counterparts and, notably, even the same number of calories each day as children living in the industrialized United States,” he added.
“Variation in things like habitual physical activity and immune activity has no detectable impact on children’s daily energy expenditure in our sample,” he said.
The study ‘Childhood Daily Energy Expenditure Does Not Decrease with Market Integration and Is Not Related to Adiposity in Amazonia’ — is published in The Journal of Nutrition, the American Society for Nutrition’s flagship journal, and was funded by the National Science Foundation.
“That initial result alone is exciting in confirming our prior finding of relative stability in children’s daily energy expenditure across different lifestyles and environments,” Urlacher said. “But our study goes further. It shows that Amazonian children who eat more high-calorie market foods — but not those who spend fewer calories every day — consistently have more body fat.”
“Together, these findings support the view that change in diet is likely the dominant factor driving the global rise in childhood obesity, particularly in the context of rapid urbanization and market integration in low- and middle-income countries,” he said.
The global rate of overweight/obesity among school-age children and adolescents has risen from 4 per cent in 1975 to 18 per cent as of 2016, according to the NCD Risk Factor Collaboration. That reflects a major global health crisis. Children who are overweight/obese often remain so into adulthood. They have shorter life expectancy and a greater lifetime risk of developing non-communicable diseases, including Type 2 diabetes and heart disease.
“While the most rapid rise in childhood overweight and obesity is now in rural areas and in low- and middle-income countries, few previous studies have actually measured, rather than simply estimated, children’s energy expenditure in these settings to identify the cause of energy imbalance,” Urlacher said.
To investigate school-age children’s diets and energy expenditure during early market integration and transition to overweight/obesity, Urlacher and co-researchers* collected data among 43 rural and 34 peri-urban Shuar children in Amazonian Ecuador. The Shuar are a large indigenous population of around 50,000. Children in the rural study sample live in a geographically isolated region and rely predominantly on a subsistence-based lifestyle based on hunting, fishing, foraging and small-scale horticulture.
In contrast, children in the peri-urban study sample live in a regional market center with access to roads, a hospital, stores, restaurants, and other market amenities.
To measure variation in market integration among households, researchers collected information on things such as income and access to running water.
They also measured children’s physical activity using wearable devices and immune activity by measuring biomarkers in minimally invasive finger-prick blood samples. Most importantly, the researchers measured children’s daily energy expenditure using the “doubly labeled water” stable isotope-tracking method and children’s resting energy expenditure using respirometry – both participant-friendly, gold-standard techniques.
The study found that:
Peri-urban children average 65 percent more body fat than rural children, with more than a third of peri-urban children classified as overweight compared to zero rural children.
Peri-urban children eat more than four times as many market-acquired items as rural children. Peri-urban and rural children have similar levels of physical activity.
Peri-urban children spend 108 calories per day less than rural children while at rest. This is related in part to 16-47 percent lower levels of immune activity.
Measures of market integration, immune activity, and physical activity have no detectable impact on children’s overall energy expenditure, with peri-urban and rural children spending roughly the same number of calories.
Variation in consumption of market foods, but not in daily energy expenditure, is related to children’s body fat.
The study is the first to measure children’s energy expenditure across market integration in a single population simultaneously with measures of diet, physical activity, and immune activity. The finding of no effect of market integration on measured daily energy expenditure is consistent with previous reports among adults and infants, Urlacher said. It also supports an evolutionary model of childhood energy constraint and allocation trade-offs described in detail by the researchers in their 2019 paper published in the journal Science Advances.
By measuring multiple aspects of the energy balance equation simultaneously, the researchers believe that their findings provide persuasive evidence for a likely primary role of changing dietary intake, rather than reduced daily energy expenditure, in driving the rise in childhood obesity in many populations. (ANI)

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Study links fried food intake to heightened serious heart disease, stroke risk

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Washington [US], January 23 (ANI): While we all know how fried food intake can lead to obesity, the findings of a recent study suggest that it is also linked to a heightened risk of major heart disease and stroke.
The findings of a pooled analysis of the available research revealed that consumption of fried-food is linked to a heightened risk of major heart disease and stroke. The results are published online in the journal ‘Heart’.
As per the study, the risk rises with each additional 114 g weekly serving. It’s clear that the Western diet doesn’t promote good cardiovascular health, but it’s not clear exactly what contribution fried food might make to the risks of serious heart disease and stroke, said the researchers.
To shed some light on this, they trawled research databases, looking for relevant studies published up to April 2020, and found 19. They pooled the data from 17, involving 562,445 participants and 36,727 major cardiovascular ‘events’, such as a heart attack or stroke, to assess cardiovascular disease risk.
They also pooled the data from six, involving 754,873 participants and 85,906 deaths over an average monitoring period of 9.5 years, to assess the potential link between fried food consumption and deaths from cardiovascular disease and from any cause.
Their analysis showed that compared with the lowest category of weekly fried food consumption, the highest was associated with a 28 per cent heightened risk of major cardiovascular events; a 22 per cent heightened risk of coronary heart disease, and a 37 per cent heightened risk of heart failure.
These associations held true when stratified by various study and participant characteristics. What’s more, a linear association emerged between fried food consumption and major cardiovascular events, coronary heart disease, and heart failure.
These risks substantially increased by 3 per cent, 2 per cent, and 12 per cent, respectively, in tandem with each additional 114 g weekly serving.
Several studies included only one type of fried food, such as fried fish, potatoes, or snacks, rather than total fried food intake, which may have underestimated the associations found, suggest the researchers.
No associations were found for deaths from cardiovascular disease or from any cause, but this might be because of the relatively small numbers involved, say the researchers.
The design of the included studies varied considerably, added to which, they all relied on memory–factors that should be taken into consideration when interpreting the results, caution the researchers.
And how exactly fried foods might influence the development of the cardiovascular disease isn’t entirely clear, they point out but suggesting several possible explanations.
Fried foods boost energy intake because of their fat content and they generate harmful trans-fatty acids from the hydrogenated vegetable oils often used to cook them.
Frying also boosts the production of chemical by-products involved in the body’s inflammatory response, while foods, such as fried chicken and French fries, are usually high in added salt, and often accompanied by sugar-sweetened drinks, particularly when served in fast-food restaurants, they say. (ANI)

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Republic Day 2021: Channel your patriotism into cooking with these 5 tri-colour recipes

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New Delhi [India], January 23 (ANI): Republic Day 2021 is just around the corner, and people are gearing up to celebrate the special day by enjoying a patriotic movie or watching the parade.
However, the ongoing coronavirus pandemic has meant more time at home for everyone. People have turned to cooking, reading, and other activities, in order to deal with the health crisis, which brings a fresh supply of stress and anxiety every day.
So while you enjoy a patriotic movie or parade on your TV sets, we bring you a list of five tri-colour recipes to satiate your taste buds, suggested by Ex Radisson Chef Anil Dahiya who has 26 years of experience in the field. So, let the tricolour feast begin:
Tri-Colour Burfi Recipe:

Ingredients:
250 grams cashew nuts, 150 grams almonds, 750 grams sugar, 300 grams ghee, 1 cup milk, 10 green cardamoms powdered, 1/4 tsp saffron powder, 1/4 tsp green colour powder, 1/4 tsp orange or red colour powder
Method:

Soak cashews and almonds separately for half an hour, then drain and peel almonds. Put the nuts in a mixer grinder to form a thick paste. Add milk and sugar and grind again. Split the paste into three separate bowls post which mix the red colour to the first part.
Add one-third of the ghee and cardamom powder. Heat the paste in a pan and stir until it leaves the sides of the pan. Pour the paste into a ghee coated plate and spread well. Add half of the remaining ghee and cardamom powder to the second mix and repeat the same process.
This paste will remain white in colour. Pour the paste when done over the red paste and spread without mixing. Add green food colour, remaining ghee, and cardamom powder to the third part. Prepare the paste with the same method and pour over the second layer. Spread it evenly and garnish with chopped almonds and cashew. Allow it to cool and once cooled, cut into square or diamond-shaped pieces.
Tiranga Halwa:

Ingredients:
For spinach halwa:
2 cups spinach (boiled, stained, and pureed), 1 tbsp pure ghee, 1 tsp crushed cardamom, 4 tsp sugar-free sugarlite, 2 cups milk
For cucumber halwa:
2 medium-sized cucumbers peeled and rinsed, 2 tbsp khoya, 3 tsp ghee, 1/2 tsp cardamom powder, 1 1/2 cup milk, 4 tbs sugar-free sugarlite
For carrot halwa:
2 small carrots peeled and rinsed, 1/2 tsp cardamom powder, 1 1/4 cup milk, 1 tbsp ghee, 4 tbsp sugar-free sugarlite, few mixed dry fruits finely chopped
Method:
Melt the ghee in a pan and add spinach puree. Saute for few minutes on low heat and mix milk, sugar, and cardamom.
Stir till spinach starts leaving the sides of the pan. Mix the remaining ingredients and stir continuously on low flame. When done, transfer to plate. For cucumber halwa, grate the cucumber and squeeze out all water. Melt the ghee in the same pan and add the grated cucumber.
Saute for 2-3 minutes and mix the remaining ingredients. Keep stirring while gradually adding milk to it. When milk dries and cucumber seems done, remove from heat and transfer to the same plate as spinach mix, making a layer on top of it.
For the carrot halwa layer, grate carrots and squeeze out all water. Heat the ghee in the same frying pan and saute carrots for 8-10 minutes on low flame. Mix milk and sugar. Continue to stir while adding the remaining ingredients. When the carrots are done, remove them from heat and layer above the first two layers. Garnish with chopped dry fruits of your choice and serve.
Tiranga Rice Dhokla:

Ingredients:
4 cups idli batter, 1 cup spinach puree, 1 tsp ginger paste, 2-3 green chillies paste, 1 tbsp gun powder Idli molagai podi, 1/2 tsp Kashmiri chilli powder, 1 small ginger paste, 2 tsp cooking oil
For garnishing:
4 tbsp Grated coconut, freshly chopped coriander leaves
For seasoning:
1 tsp mustard seeds, a few curry leaves broken bits, 1 tsp oil
Method:
Pour the batter into a big bowl, add salt, and divide into 3 equal parts. For the orange batter, mix one portion of batter, gun powder, and chilli powder. Leave aside one part for the white batter. For the green batter, mix the remaining third portion of batter, spinach puree, ginger paste, green chilli paste, and a pinch of salt. Now mix all the ingredients mentioned for a green layer, stirring well.
Keep a good amount of water in a big vessel on high heat. Grease any flat steel plate and transfer the prepared green batter to a greased plate and steam it over the vessel of water. When done, pour white batter and steam.
Then add a third layer and steam. Dhokla will be done in 15 minutes. Remove from heat and cool. Cut into desired shapes and plate it. Heat oil in a small saucepan and make the tempering of seasoning ingredients. Pour the seasoning over Tiranga dhokla and garnish with grated coconut and chopped coriander.
Tri-Colour Fruit Cream:

Ingredients:
Vanilla flavoured ice cream – 4 scoops or whipped cream, some nuts to garnish, mixed fruits 1 tbsp optional, a cherry on top, fresh fruits – kiwi, orange, or papaya
Method:
Take a tall glass and add kiwi at the bottom and add in a scoop of softly whipped cream, or vanilla ice cream. Add vanilla ice cream, on top, put orange fruits again. Garnish with nuts and top it with a cherry or mint. Serve immediately.
Tricolour Sandwich:

Ingredients:
6 bread slices, butter for spreading
For the green layer:
2 tbsp mint chutney, 1/2 cup grated paneer cottage cheese, salt to taste
For the orange layer:
10 orange cherry tomato, 2 tbsp mayonnaise, salt to taste
Method:
Chopped orange tomato and set it aside. Butter the bread slices and set them aside. For the green layer, mix mint chutney, paneer, and salt in a bowl well and set aside. For the orange layer, mix tomato, mayonnaise, and salt in a separate bowl well and set aside.
On a buttered slice of bread, spread the green mixture and top with another slice of bread. After that, layer with the carrot mixture and another slice of bread and serve.
So now that we have got you all covered, enjoy this Republic Day by gorging on these absolutely delicious recipes. (ANI)

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Worse heart health noticed in fat people, even in those who exercise

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Sophia Antipolis [France], December 23 (ANI): While some people may believe that physical activity can help mitigate the effects of excess body weight, a new study, however, counters it. The study advocates that physical activity does not undo the negative effects of excess body weight on heart health.
The study was published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
“One cannot be ‘fat but healthy’,” said study author Dr Alejandro Lucia of the European University, Madrid, Spain. “This was the first nationwide analysis to show that being regularly active is not likely to eliminate the detrimental health effects of excess body fat. Our findings refute the notion that a physically active lifestyle can completely negate the deleterious effects of overweight and obesity.”
There is some evidence that fitness might mitigate the negative effects of excess body weight on heart health. It has been suggested that in adults and children, being “fat but fit” might be associated with similar cardiovascular health to being “thin but unfit”.
Dr. Lucia said: “This has led to controversial proposals for health policies to prioritise physical activity and fitness above weight loss. Our study sought to clarify the links between activity, body weight, and heart health.”
The study used data from 527,662 working adults insured by a large occupational risk prevention company in Spain. The average age of participants was 42 years and 32% were women.
Participants were categorised as normal weight (body mass index [BMI] 20.0-24.9 kg/m2), overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9 kg/m2), or obese (BMI 30.0 kg/m2 or above). Additionally, they were grouped by activity level: 1) regularly active, defined as doing the minimum recommended for adults by the World Health Organization2 (WHO); 2) insufficiently active (some moderate to vigorous physical activity every week but less than the WHO minimum); 3) inactive (no exercise). Cardiovascular health was determined according to three major risk factors for heart attack and stroke, namely diabetes, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure.
Approximately 42% of participants were normal weight, 41% were overweight, and 18% were obese. The majority were inactive (63.5%), while 12.3% were insufficiently active, and 24.2% were regularly active. Some 30% had high cholesterol, 15% had high blood pressure, and 3% had diabetes.
The researchers investigated the associations between each BMI and activity group and the three risk factors. At all BMI levels, any activity (whether it met the WHO minimum or not) was linked with a lower likelihood of diabetes, high blood pressure or high cholesterol compared to no exercise at all. Dr. Lucia said: “This tells us that everyone, irrespective of their body weight, should be physically active to safeguard their health.”
At all weights, the odds of diabetes and hypertension decreased as physical activity rose. “More activity is better, so walking 30 minutes per day is better than walking 15 minutes a day,” he said.
However, overweight and obese participants were at greater cardiovascular risk than their peers with normal weight, irrespective of activity levels. As an example, compared to inactive normal-weight individuals, active obese people were approximately twice as likely to have high cholesterol, four times more likely to have diabetes, and five times more likely to have high blood pressure.
Dr. Lucia said: “Exercise does not seem to compensate for the negative effects of excess weight. This finding was also observed overall in both men and women when they were analysed separately.”
He concluded: “Fighting obesity and inactivity is equally important; it should be a joint battle. Weight loss should remain a primary target for health policies together with promoting active lifestyles.” (ANI)

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Here are some details about Varun Dhawan, Natasha Dalal’s wedding festivities!

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Mumbai (Maharashtra) [India], January 23 (ANI): Bollywood actor Varun Dhawan is soon going to tie the knot with his longtime girlfriend and fashion designer Natasha Dalal. The preparations for the couple’s wedding are in full swing.
The much-in-love couple will be taking their nuptial vows on January 24 at The Mansion House, a beach resort, in Alibaug. Varun and Natasha’s mehendi ceremony was reportedly hosted on Friday, in the presence of family and friends.
Famous celebrity mehendi artist Veena Nagda was present for Varun and Natasha’s mehendi. For the uninitiated, Veena happens to have done the bridal mehendi of several A-listers including Sonam Kapoor Ahuja and Deepika Padukone.
On Saturday night, ace filmmaker Karan Johar will reportedly host a grand sangeet for the couple. The sangeet will be a starry-affair with performances by the likes of Alia Bhatt, Janhvi Kapoor, Arjun Kapoor among several others. The couple too will reportedly be performing on a romantic number for their special day.
Varun and Natasha, who have opted for an extremely private wedding affair on the outskirts of Mumbai, reportedly have a strict phone policy in place for the wedding festivities.
Bollywood celebrities including Shah Rukh Khan, Salman Khan, Katrina Kaif, Jacqueline Fernandez, and Shraddha Kapoor are also expected to attend the wedding. However, the Bachchan family may not be a part of the celebrations, as per reports.
Ever since the news about the couple’s wedding broke out, social media has been flooded with ‘#varunkishadi’ and other trends, celebrating the happy news.



Varun and Natasha reportedly knew each other since their school days. The two fell in love when they met at a music concert years later. However, the duo has always kept their relationship low-key. Varun publicly acknowledged that he is dating Natasha when he posted a photo featuring himself with his girlfriend on her birthday in 2019.
Meanwhile, on the work front, Varun was last seen in his father David Dhawan’s ‘Coolie No.1’, co-starring Sara Ali Khan. The actor will be next seen in ‘Jug Jugg Jeeyo’ alongside Anil Kapoor, Kiara Advani, and Neetu Kapoor. (ANI)

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Study reveals coffee temporarily counteracts effect of sleep loss on cognitive function

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Washington [US], January 23 (ANI): Consuming caffeinated coffee during the day helps to minimise reductions in attention and cognitive function, compared to decaffeinated coffee, suggest the findings of a new study.
The study explored the impact of repeated sleep loss during a simulated working week.
While this effect occurred in the first three-to-four days of restricted sleep, by the fifth and final day, no difference was seen between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee drinkers. This, therefore, suggests that the beneficial effects of coffee for people with restricted sleep are temporary.
It is estimated that over 30% of adult Western populations sleep less than the recommended seven to eight hours on weekday nights and 15% regularly sleep less than six hours. This can have a considerable impact on people’s health and wellbeing, including causing sleepiness and impairing vigilance and attention.
Denise Lange, the study co-author, commented: “Previous research suggests that acute consumption of caffeinated coffee can reduce the impact of sleep deprivation on deficits of attention and cognitive function in a short-term setting.”
“This study is among the first to examine whether this effect can be translated into a real-world situation, where caffeinated drinks are commonly consumed every day by people who experience chronic sleep restriction. Our study indicates that moderate coffee intake can mitigate some repercussions of reduced sleep over a few days, however, this is not a substitute for a good night’s sleep in the long term.”
The study was conducted at the state-of-the-art Institute of Aerospace Medicine, in Cologne Germany. 26 participants carrying a distinct genotype of the gene encoding the adenosine A2A receptor were randomly assigned to groups either drinking caffeinated coffee (containing 300 mg caffeine) or decaffeinated coffee under double-blind conditions.
During five days, the sleep of all participants was restricted to five hours per night and each day they rated their subjective sleepiness and were tested on levels of vigilance, alertness, reaction time, accuracy and memory. (ANI)

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